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Hakka Cuisine@Fu Gua Thong, Bandar Puteri Puchong

Bitter gourd, or bitter melon, is a common ingredient in Chinese cuisine, often stir-fried with meat or eggs, or served in a soup. It has many purported health benefits, including reducing blood sugar levels, as well as aiding in weight loss. I think the latter is because it’s so bitter, you wouldn’t be able to finish the dish anyway. Eat less = lose weight = profit. (You can probably tell I don’t like bitter gourd very much, lol).

Jokes aside, there are people who enjoy the vegetable’s distinct flavour – so if you’re craving a nutritious and tasty(?) bitter gourd dish, head to Fu Gua Thong Restaurant in Bandar Puteri Puchong. Their signature bitter gourd soup, cooked with tender slices of pork, is a crowd puller, and while I won’t order this on my own volition, I’ve had it before with the fam and can attest that they cook it in a way that doesn’t make the bitterness pronounced.

Wait. So this isn’t a review about their bittergourd dish?

Well, for fellow bittergourd haters like me, a trip to Fu Gua Thong is still worth it for their Hakka cuisine, with dishes such as Deep Fried Hakka Style Pork (zha yuk), Yam and pork belly, stuffed tau fu pok, and stir-fried yam and abacus seed. The Hubs and I were here for dinner over the weekend, and even though we only ordered two dishes to share, they were both excellent and reasonably priced.

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Typical Chinese restaurant vibe. There’s a small section selling snacks, pastries, and groceries at the front of the restaurant.
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The stir-fried fish slices in ginger and onion came in a generous portion, swimming in a rich, and savoury sauce. The fish slices were fresh, thick, and firm,and the sauce made it an excellent accompaniment to rice. The ginger and onion not only gave it a nice flavour, but also masked any fishy odours the seafood might have had.

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This is my favourite at Fu Gua Thong – Hakka fried pork! Thick slices of pork belly are marinated in nam yue (a fermented beancurd sauce – my dad hates the stuff, so we don’t have this often at family dinners), then deep fried to give it a crispy, crunchy exterior. The meat inside was fatty but not greasy. It was served with a side of chilli sauce, which accentuated the salty flavour.

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Our simple but tasty meal for two!

So yeah. While Fu Gua Thong’s bittergourd dishes are sure to satisfy fans, they have many other dishes that are decent as well. Service wise, waiters appear harried and are not exactly welcoming, with curt/bordering on rude responses, but if you have zero expectations for service, this is a good place for the food.

FU GUA THONG (PUCHONG)

32, Jalan Puteri 2/4, Bandar Puteri, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 11AM – 3.30PM, 5.30PM – 9.30PM (Daily)

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Roast Meats @ Chan Meng Kee, Bandar Puteri Puchong

The Chan Meng Kee brand, famed for its roasted meats, was started in 2008 by Chan Yoke Pui, a self-professed ‘charsiew fanatic’. The original restaurant in SS2, Petaling Jaya, quickly gained a loyal following, as patrons thronged the store for their dose of siew yuk (crispy roast pork), char siew (sweet barbecued pork), and roast chicken, served with their signature noodles or rice.

Today, Chan Meng Kee has two other branches – one in Da Men Mall USJ, and another in Puchong, the latter of which I visited for lunch with the fam. The store is simple but comfortable, with basic tables and chairs, floor to ceiling windows that afford plenty of natural sunlight, and air conditioning. Diners can also see the chefs chopping up the meats through a glass window next to the kitchen.

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Our food did not take long to arrive. The Hubs ordered the siew yuk, which came in generous portions atop a bed of cucumbers. The rice was also topped with two slices of sweet liver sausage. The pork was well seasoned, with crunchy, crackly skin, and a nice balance between the lean and fat. The liver sausage was superb – basted in a sweet, caramel-like sauce, the sausage casing was chewy on the outside, with bits of fat within the sausage that lent it a unique texture. It was so good I ordered a separate plate!

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Liver sausage is a rarer menu item compared to the usual trio of roasties – chicken, siew yuk, and char siew.
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Chan Meng Kee does roast duck as well. I like that they gave me the thigh part; there was a lot of meat, and it was easy to eat. The blend of textures and flavours – crispy skin, the melt-in-your-mouth layer of fat underneath it, the slightly gamey duck meat seasoned with herbs and spices – came together perfectly. While I still prefer the roast duck from Soon Lok, Chan Meng Kee can probably give it a run for its money.

Aside from roast items, the restaurant also offers dishes such as poached chicken, curry laksa, shrimp wontons, and more. Prices are reasonable for the setting, ranging around RM10-RM15 for single plates.

CHAN MENG KEE (PUCHONG)

No.1-GF, Jalan Puteri 1/4, Bandar Puteri, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 9AM – 3.30PM, 5PM – 8.30PM (closed Wednesdays)

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Aroy-D-Thai Kitchen, Taman Putra Impiana, Puchong

Aroy” is Thai for ‘tasty’, making it a preferred moniker for many Thai restaurants. One such place is Aroy-D-Thai Kitchen in Taman Putra Impiana, Puchong, a no-frills spot serving authentic Thai favourites the likes of tom yam, pad thai, and pad krapow gai.

So, does the restaurant live up to its name? Let’s find out!

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It’s hard to miss the store, what with the colourful posters of Thai tourist destinations plastered against the glass. Inside, an air conditioned interior offers diners a cool respite from the heat. The restaurant is simple with minimal decor, but comfortable enough for a quick lunch.

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The restaurant offers a selection of ‘single’ rice and noodle dishes, as well as ala carte items meant for sharing and to go with rice. There’s tom yum, curries, stir-fried vegetables, seafood, pork, and chicken dishes.

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The Moomins ordered her favourite – pad krapao gai (basil chicken with rice), minus the chilli as her stomach problems make it difficult to eat spicy food. They were very accomodating, and the rice came in a hefty portion as well, topped with fried egg.

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The Hub’s had tom yum fried rice, which again came in a generous portion. The ingredients were fresh and the rice had been stir fried over high heat, imparting each grain with a fragrant aroma and smokiness. Although the dish packed some heat, I couldn’t really tell it was tom yum per se – tasted more like spicy fried rice. Still, a tasty and filling dish to keep you going for the day!

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As for me, I went with the pad thai, fresh out of the wok with wisps of steam when it came to the table. On top of a bed of rice noodles lay two large pieces of shrimp, tofu cubes, a fluffy omelette, a side of crushed peanuts, and a lemon wedge.

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What can I say? It’s pretty decent pad thai. I like the sweet and sticky sauce, which goes well with the noodles’ chewy texture, and the overall flavours are well balanced.

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We also got fried mushrooms to share. The dish surprised me: mushrooms are notorious for soaking up oil, but these were light and not greasy at all. The batter was crispy and not too thick, and the mushrooms were well seasoned too.

Considering that you get to dine in air conditioned comfort, and the dishes are tasty, I’d say Aroy-D-Thai offers great value for money – a good spot for a lunch break for office workers, or people who live in the nearby housing areas. Single dishes start from RM10.90.

AROY-D-THAI KITCHEN

38, 1, Jalan Putra Impiana, Taman Putra Impiana, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 10.30AM – 8PM

Mama Mee Yah, IOI Mall Puchong

Mama is a household name in Thailand. In fact, the brand is so popular, the term ‘Mama’ is used as a generic term to refer to all instant noodle brands (kinda like what we do with Maggi here: Vits, Cintan, Ibumie = Maggi).

While Mama noodles aren’t hard to find in Malaysia, they are pretty rare in most supermarkets, so you’re more likely to find them in Thai grocers, specialty shops, or restaurants. One of the newer places to get a ‘fancy’ version of these noodles is Mama Mee Yah@IOI Mall Puchong. As the name suggests, the resto specializes in Mama noodles, spruced up with ingredients like seafood and chicken, but you can also order Thai rice dishes like stir-fried chicken with basil.

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Nice interior, which hasn’t changed much from when this space used to be Pho Street.

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The Hubs and I weren’t particularly hungry, so we decided to share one main meal and order a side dish. We were disappointed when it came to the table, because there wasn’t a lot of noodles, and just four average-sized chicken meatballs plus an egg. Not worth the price, which is close to RM20 per bowl. I could have cooked five packets of Mama mee plus my own fancy trimmings with that budget.

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Okay, so portions aren’t great. What about the taste?

It didn’t do well in that regard either. The tomyum was quite bland and watery. It wasn’t bad to the point of being inedible, but I really cannot justify paying that much for average food that I could have made at home. We also regretted our order of grilled chicken skewers, as they were drier than the Sahara desert.

Unfortunately, the signatures that we ordered at Mama Mee Yah did not impress. Considering the hefty price tag, I don’t think we will be giving this place a return visit.

Now if you want cheap, authentic Thai food, I recommend this. Or if you want a fancier place with lots of variety but won’t burn a hole in your pocket and actually gives you good value for money, this.

MAMA MEE YAH (IOI MALL PUCHONG)

Lot FS-20, First Floor, Batu 9, Jalan Puchong, Bandar Puchong Jaya, 47170 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 10AM -10PM (daily)

PS: Opinions here are entirely my own and are based on my personal taste. They are not to disparage businesses, but to provide an honest review of my experiences.

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Five Guys Malaysia @ SkyAvenue, Genting Highlands

American fast food chain Five Guys – known for their Cajun-style fries, hamburgers, and milkshakes – debuted in Malaysia back in October 2021. Malaysians, of course, dutifully fell into hour-long queues at their outlet in Genting Highlands, despite the menu’s hefty price tags. Since then, they’ve opened another branch in Pavilion Kuala Lumpur, so fans of the franchise need not drive all the way up Genting.

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As usual, I am late aboard the hype train. So late, in fact, that the train has come and gone – because when the Hubs and I dropped by for lunch recently, there was no queue and there were plenty of seats available for dine-in.

PS: Dining here was not part of the plan. I wanted pizza at Motorino’s, but they weren’t open yet. (Restaurants in Genting open really late on Saturday for some reason -__-)

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Five Guys boasts a spacious interior, with an open-air kitchen where you can watch the cooks in action. The interior design features white and red chequered tiles, wooden tables, and counter seating. You’ll also see a bunch of potato sacks near the entrance, a homage to the brand’s history. Apparently back in the day when stores didn’t have enough storage space, they’d stack bags of potatoes in the dining area. These days, this configuration is used for aesthetics.

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There aren’t many items on the menu, but I prefer it this way. I’d rather dine at a place that excels in making one or two good mains, over better variety but mediocre dishes.

At Five Guys, they basically serve just hamburgers (basically the Cheeseburger and the Hamburger, and ‘little’ versions which are smaller in size), hotdogs, fries, sandwiches (with vegan options), and milkshakes.

I see many reviews touting the burgers as “pricey”. While I agree that they are more expensive than your regular burgers, I don’t think it’s fair to bash them for it because we all know food in Genting is pricey af. And to be honest, I’d rather spend RM35 on a filling burger than I would for nasi lemak or chicken rice (which is what some of the restos at Genting price them at. Very ordinary kopitiam food at an exorbitant price).

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The Hubs got a Hamburger, which came wrapped in foil for easy eating. The portion was huge, with double patties stuffed between toasted sesame seed buns.

You can customize the toppings, with options such as mayo, mustard, ketchup, barbecue sauce and hot sauce, as well as relish, grilled mushrooms, onions, pickles, tomatoes, lettuce, jalapenos, and green peppers. As we were keen to try the ‘original’ taste, we simply had all of the toppings included.

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The Hubs gave it his seal of approval, declaring it the ‘best gourmet burger’ he had so far in Malaysia. I’m not a big fan of beef burgers, but this was pretty good in my opinion. The patties were moist but not to the point of being greasy (which I think some people prefer), and the meat was well seasoned but not too salty. All of the toppings came together really well too.

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My Cheese Dog (RM30), while tasty, was not worth RM30 imo. The toppings are the same; I requested no pickles, but it got into the hotdog somehow lol. I recommend getting the burger rather than the hotdog if you want more value for your money.

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Last but not least, we splurged on a Milkshake (RM25). Yes, yes, RM25 is a lot for a drink – but we figured since we aren’t going to come this way for a long time, might as well just go the whole hog.

Like the burgers, you can customize “mix-ins” for your milkshake, including vanilla, chocolate, strawberries, peanut butter, Oreo cookies, salted caramel, bananas, and malted milk. We had ours with vanilla and Oreo cookies. My verdict? I liked it; it was rich and sweet – probably not something you’d have on the daily. The mix was so thick and creamy that we actually had trouble drinking it through the straw lol.

My thoughts on Five Guys? Despite reviews calling it overpriced and overrated, I think the burger is something worth trying. Of course, this is purely my personal opinion/taste: I know there are many who say that brands such as KGB or even local joint MyBurgerLab offer better gourmet burgers. But for me, Five Guys is a pretty decent food option in Genting Highlands.

FIVE GUYS MALAYSIA (GENTING HIGHLANDS)

Lot SA – T2A – 25, SkyAvenue, 69000 Genting Highlands, Pahang

Opening hours: 11AM – 10PM (daily)

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Cafe Yamatatsu, Old Klang Road, Kuala Lumpur

Cafe Yamatatsu is a gem that you have to go hunting for. Originally a pop-up at Kongsi KL, the Japanese-Taiwanese eatery has since moved into permanent quarters just off Old Klang Road’s sixth mile, hidden within a quiet industrial estate.

It was a cloudy Saturday evening, and after missing the turning twice, we finally pulled into a street that looked almost deserted. As we were wondering if this was the right place, Yamatatsu’s distinctive storefront – with Japanese characters emblazoned on traditional noren (banners) – loomed into view. And even though we were early (the store opens at 6PM for dinner service; we were there at 5.45PM), there was already a queue – a testament to the place’s popularity.

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We didn’t have to wait long. A waitress popped out of the shop to take down the number of people in queue, before sliding the wooden door open to reveal a Japanese-style diner, warm and cozy in hues of beige and brown. One side of the space was dedicated to the kitchen and bar, the counter lined with sake bottles; the other featured anime posters on its walls. We were quickly seated and given a QR code menu.

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The menu features a plethora of Japanese and Taiwanese dishes, the likes of braised pork rice, mee suah, udon, oyakodon, and more. But aside from the popular staples, you can also get regional specialties, such as the Creamy Potato Salmon, which is a nostalgic home-cooked favourite in Hokkaido, or Tamago Kake Gohan with natto, featuring a pasteurized egg marinated over soy sauce, and fermented beans. Other unique creations include the Stewed Pork Rib with Corn, and Taiwanese Chicken Chop and Duck Rice, which pairs the iconic Taiwanese deep fried boneless chicken thigh with fatty slices of smoked duck over a bed of rice.

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We ordered an appetizer of Yamatatsu fried chicken (RM11) and two of their recommended dishes: braised pork rice (RM9.50), and chicken over rice (RM9). The prices are a steal, considering the cafe’s setting. Even some kopitiams without air conditioning charge that much these days. Our orders were processed quickly and arrived to the table within minutes.

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The fried chicken is made Japanese-style — that is, extremely crunchy on the outside, thanks to the use of potato starch and a double-fry method. The cuts are from the thigh, so they have a nice, juicy texture. The meat is also well-marinated in soy sauce, giving it a sweet and savoury taste. While karaage is typically served with Japanese mayonnaise, Yamatatsu pairs it with wasabi mayo, which is creamy with a pungent kick: it’ll keep you coming back for more!

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The chicken over rice is a specialty in Chiayi, Taiwan. Tender pieces of shredded chicken are laid atop rice, then drizzled over with fragrant scallion oil and soy sauce. The bowl is served with pickled cucumbers and egg. Simple, but comforting food.

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The star for me at Yamatatsu is their braised pork rice. While this dish is extremely common thanks to the many Taiwanese restaurants we have in the Klang Valley, some places serve the meat minced (gasp!); else, the pork belly is sliced too thickly, or they include pickled vegetables (*which to me spoils the entire bowl. the star is meant to be the pork!).

In my opinion, Yamatatsu’s is the closest you can get to authentic Taiwanese street food: the pork belly is cut into small pieces and braised until it boasts a sticky gelatinous texture. The thick, caramel-like sauce is lip smackingly good, rich and savoury. People who love rice and meat should easily be able to polish off at least two bowls of this!

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For drinks, I went for the Sparkling Honey (RM7.50). It tasted exactly like the carbonated HoneyB brand from Australia; sweet and fizzy, but spruced up with some herbs. It was perfect for cutting through the greasiness of the fried chicken and braised pork.

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Hubs had the Yoghurt Sake (RM20). Had a small sip. I don’t like alcohol so I can’t really judge; it tasted okay to me but not something I would drink on my own volition. The Hubs loved it though, and described it as “interesting, because you can taste both the yoghurt and sake blending together, but you also get the distinctive flavours of each”.

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We left with satisfied tummies and a warm, fuzzy sense of satisfaction.

Their prices are very affordable, portions are generous, and the service is impeccable – the latter is somewhat of a rarity in many F&B outlets in Malaysia – so a big thumbs up to the Yamatatsu team. If you’re planning to stop by for your Japanese/Taiwanese food fix, I suggest coming early to avoid the queue.

CAFE YAMATATSU 山達小舖

30, Jalan 2/131A Project Jaya Industrial Estate, Batu, 6, Jln Klang Lama, 58200 Kuala Lumpur

Open Fridays to Tuesdays (12PM-3PM, 6PM-9.30PM). Closed on Weds and Thurs.

https://www.my-yamatatsu.com/

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Jin Taiwan, Bandar Puteri Puchong

Some years back, I posted about eating pork noodles with all the trimmings – ie kidneys, liver, and intestines – and a reader commented on how I shouldn’t be eating the organs of internal animals, as they are ‘full of cholesterol and bacteria’. They then proceeded to lecture me, an Asian who has eaten internal organs my entire life because it is a big part of my cuisine, about how these are cleansing organs, and can be harmful if ingested.

Welp, still alive and kicking pretty well after 32 years. So. *shrugs*

Perhaps the comment was well-intentioned, but the wording sucked, and I’m going to call it what is: ethnocentrism. It’s not uncommon to come across people like this who think that their culture is above another’s, labelling anything different as dirty, disgusting, or subpar compared to theirs. Some, like said commenter, might even try to educate you on your own cuisine.

Hey, I find reindeer blood and rotten herring pretty odd too, but I don’t judge you for it (*you can probably guess where my commenter is from, lol).

Some westerners may label animal guts as gross, but most of the world’s population, including in China and Latin American countries (contrary to popular belief, the world does not revolve around Europe and the US, folks!) enjoy offal as part of their diet. In places that have historically experienced poverty and strife, nothing on an animal is wasted – and why would they be, when these are the parts loaded with protein?

While yes, they can be high in cholesterol, so is full fat dairy and red muscle meat – a staple of western diets. And burgers and chips. You don’t eat them every day, do you? You switch it around, pair it with veggies, or other dishes. Same thing.

And as for bacteria, you get bacteria in all sorts of meat if it isn’t prepared well – it isn’t limited to just organ meat.

But I digress from my veryyyyyy long rant about ethnocentrism and cultural cuisine. I was actually gonna post about the time I had intestines from a Taiwanese restaurant in Puchong 😀

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Located within a busy commercial area in Bandar Puteri Puchong, Jin Taiwan Restaurant specializes in Taiwanese cuisine, offering a variety of classic dishes such as braised pork with rice, salted fried chicken chop, oyster mee sua, and more. I’ve passed by the place many times, but never got down to trying it until recently. The resto is no-frills, sort of like a canteen more than a place to hangout, but it’s comfortable and air conditioned. Prices are relatively affordable too for the setting, with most main dishes averaging around RM12-RM15.

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I was happy to see braised intestines on the menu, because this dish is hard to find outside of select Taiwanese restaurants (the only one I can think of is Fong Lye). I ordered a plate to pair with rice. Intestines are difficult to prepare as cleaning them is an arduous process, but Jin Taiwan does it well. The intestines tasted clean and the rich soy sauce masked the natural, slight gaminess that usually comes with organ meat. Also, I love chewy things and these were just right: chewy and bouncy to the bite, but not stringy.

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The Hubs had braised pork belly rice. It was served in a humongous portion with some vegetables and a fried egg: I think the meat was good enough for two. The pork belly was fatty, but not in a gross way; instead, the fat kind of melted in the mouth as it was very tender from the braising process.

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We washed down our simple meal with Jasmine tea with honey, and red tea – both perfect to cut through the meat’s greasiness.

There are many other dishes we have yet to try out on the menu, but I can see myself coming back here whenever I need an intestine fix lol.

JIN TAIWAN RESTAURANT

72, Jalan Puteri 5/1, Bandar Puteri, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 12PM – 8.30PM (closed Tuesdays)

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Taco Bell, IOI Boulevard Puchong

Growing up, I often wondered what Taco Bell tasted like. What was this Tex-Mex inspired cuisine that Americans seem to enjoy so much in TV series and dramas? This was back in the 90s and 2000s, when Tex-Mex food wasn’t as popular as it is today, and places serving them in Malaysia were few and far between (other than, perhaps, Chili’s).

Since then, Tex-Mex joints have quadrupled, often in the form of food trucks and casual eateries serving burritos, nachos, quesadillas, and the like. With Taco Bell officially making its entry into Malaysia in the last couple of months – and the fanfare it has received – it seems like the era of Tex-Mex is finally coming into its own.

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Recently, The Hubs and I spotted a Taco Bell branch at IOI Boulevard, Puchong – and thought of checking it out. It has been about six months since Taco Bell opened its first outlet, so the hype has died down a little (when it first opened, queues at their Cyberjaya branch lasted hours).

During our visit to the Puchong branch, the shop was busy, but there was still seating available outdoors.

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Bright and cheerful interior packed with a lunch crowd, mostly comprising youngsters and office workers.

The menu features signatures like tacos (both soft and hard shell versions), burritos, rice bowls with beans and vegetables, wraps, and quesadillas. You get to choose from different proteins, such as chicken, beef, and beans. Meals are paired with sides of nachos or fries, and refillable drinks. After you order at the counter, they give you a device that will alert you when your food is ready for collection.

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Our orders: N’s beef burrito with fries, and my chicken quesadilla with nachos.

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My chicken quesadilla was excellent. The tortilla was soft, they were generous with the cheese, and since the meal was served warm, the cheese was still stretchy and oozy, while the chicken meat was tender and juicy. Just a great quesadilla overall. The nachos, which are spiced with what I guess is paprika (?) was crazy addictive. Next time around I might go for the loaded nachos, which are piled high with avocado guacamole, pico de gallo salsa, sour cream, and cheese sauce.

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Bubbly, oozy cheese.

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The Hub’s fries were good too: freshly fried, thick cut, and well seasoned. The burrito was packed to bursting, with moist and juicy beef pairing well with the vegetables.

Overall, I think Taco Bell lives up to its reputation and I can see why it has become such an iconic part of American West Coast food and pop culture. I think it’s also a nice change from our usual fast food joints that serve burgers and fried chicken. Will be back to try their other menu items!

PS: Prices are average for a fast food place; set meals cost around RM15++.

TACO BELL (PUCHONG)

F-21-G, IOI Boulevard Puchong, Jalan Kenari 6, Bandar Puchong Jaya, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 10AM – 11PM

tacobell.com.my

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