Jin Taiwan, Bandar Puteri Puchong

Some years back, I posted about eating pork noodles with all the trimmings – ie kidneys, liver, and intestines – and a reader commented on how I shouldn’t be eating the organs of internal animals, as they are ‘full of cholesterol and bacteria’. They then proceeded to lecture me, an Asian who has eaten internal organs my entire life because it is a big part of my cuisine, about how these are cleansing organs, and can be harmful if ingested.

Welp, still alive and kicking pretty well after 32 years. So. *shrugs*

Perhaps the comment was well-intentioned, but the wording sucked, and I’m going to call it what is: ethnocentrism. It’s not uncommon to come across people like this who think that their culture is above another’s, labelling anything different as dirty, disgusting, or subpar compared to theirs. Some, like said commenter, might even try to educate you on your own cuisine.

Hey, I find reindeer blood and rotten herring pretty odd too, but I don’t judge you for it (*you can probably guess where my commenter is from, lol).

Some westerners may label animal guts as gross, but most of the world’s population, including in China and Latin American countries (contrary to popular belief, the world does not revolve around Europe and the US, folks!) enjoy offal as part of their diet. In places that have historically experienced poverty and strife, nothing on an animal is wasted – and why would they be, when these are the parts loaded with protein?

While yes, they can be high in cholesterol, so is full fat dairy and red muscle meat – a staple of western diets. And burgers and chips. You don’t eat them every day, do you? You switch it around, pair it with veggies, or other dishes. Same thing.

And as for bacteria, you get bacteria in all sorts of meat if it isn’t prepared well – it isn’t limited to just organ meat.

But I digress from my veryyyyyy long rant about ethnocentrism and cultural cuisine. I was actually gonna post about the time I had intestines from a Taiwanese restaurant in Puchong 😀

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Located within a busy commercial area in Bandar Puteri Puchong, Jin Taiwan Restaurant specializes in Taiwanese cuisine, offering a variety of classic dishes such as braised pork with rice, salted fried chicken chop, oyster mee sua, and more. I’ve passed by the place many times, but never got down to trying it until recently. The resto is no-frills, sort of like a canteen more than a place to hangout, but it’s comfortable and air conditioned. Prices are relatively affordable too for the setting, with most main dishes averaging around RM12-RM15.

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I was happy to see braised intestines on the menu, because this dish is hard to find outside of select Taiwanese restaurants (the only one I can think of is Fong Lye). I ordered a plate to pair with rice. Intestines are difficult to prepare as cleaning them is an arduous process, but Jin Taiwan does it well. The intestines tasted clean and the rich soy sauce masked the natural, slight gaminess that usually comes with organ meat. Also, I love chewy things and these were just right: chewy and bouncy to the bite, but not stringy.

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The Hubs had braised pork belly rice. It was served in a humongous portion with some vegetables and a fried egg: I think the meat was good enough for two. The pork belly was fatty, but not in a gross way; instead, the fat kind of melted in the mouth as it was very tender from the braising process.

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We washed down our simple meal with Jasmine tea with honey, and red tea – both perfect to cut through the meat’s greasiness.

There are many other dishes we have yet to try out on the menu, but I can see myself coming back here whenever I need an intestine fix lol.

JIN TAIWAN RESTAURANT

72, Jalan Puteri 5/1, Bandar Puteri, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 12PM – 8.30PM (closed Tuesdays)

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Taco Bell, IOI Boulevard Puchong

Growing up, I often wondered what Taco Bell tasted like. What was this Tex-Mex inspired cuisine that Americans seem to enjoy so much in TV series and dramas? This was back in the 90s and 2000s, when Tex-Mex food wasn’t as popular as it is today, and places serving them in Malaysia were few and far between (other than, perhaps, Chili’s).

Since then, Tex-Mex joints have quadrupled, often in the form of food trucks and casual eateries serving burritos, nachos, quesadillas, and the like. With Taco Bell officially making its entry into Malaysia in the last couple of months – and the fanfare it has received – it seems like the era of Tex-Mex is finally coming into its own.

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Recently, The Hubs and I spotted a Taco Bell branch at IOI Boulevard, Puchong – and thought of checking it out. It has been about six months since Taco Bell opened its first outlet, so the hype has died down a little (when it first opened, queues at their Cyberjaya branch lasted hours).

During our visit to the Puchong branch, the shop was busy, but there was still seating available outdoors.

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Bright and cheerful interior packed with a lunch crowd, mostly comprising youngsters and office workers.

The menu features signatures like tacos (both soft and hard shell versions), burritos, rice bowls with beans and vegetables, wraps, and quesadillas. You get to choose from different proteins, such as chicken, beef, and beans. Meals are paired with sides of nachos or fries, and refillable drinks. After you order at the counter, they give you a device that will alert you when your food is ready for collection.

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Our orders: N’s beef burrito with fries, and my chicken quesadilla with nachos.

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My chicken quesadilla was excellent. The tortilla was soft, they were generous with the cheese, and since the meal was served warm, the cheese was still stretchy and oozy, while the chicken meat was tender and juicy. Just a great quesadilla overall. The nachos, which are spiced with what I guess is paprika (?) was crazy addictive. Next time around I might go for the loaded nachos, which are piled high with avocado guacamole, pico de gallo salsa, sour cream, and cheese sauce.

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Bubbly, oozy cheese.

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The Hub’s fries were good too: freshly fried, thick cut, and well seasoned. The burrito was packed to bursting, with moist and juicy beef pairing well with the vegetables.

Overall, I think Taco Bell lives up to its reputation and I can see why it has become such an iconic part of American West Coast food and pop culture. I think it’s also a nice change from our usual fast food joints that serve burgers and fried chicken. Will be back to try their other menu items!

PS: Prices are average for a fast food place; set meals cost around RM15++.

TACO BELL (PUCHONG)

F-21-G, IOI Boulevard Puchong, Jalan Kenari 6, Bandar Puchong Jaya, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 10AM – 11PM

tacobell.com.my

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Okonomi @ Tokyo Street, Pavilion KL

Another day, another food adventure – this time at Pavilion KL’s Tokyo Street!

Much like J’s Gate Dining at Lot 10 Shopping Centre next door, Tokyo Street houses a slew of Japanese eateries, serving everything from shabu-shabu (hotpot) and sushi, to authentic matcha desserts. We had our sights set on Okonomi, a casual spot specializing in – what else – okonomiyaki.

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For the uninitiated, okonomiyaki is a Japanese savoury pancake, comprising shredded cabbage mixed with batter and items such as pork, shrimp, beef, or even cheese. It is flattened and cooked on a teppan (hotplate) before topping with okonomiyaki sauce, dried seaweed flakes, and katsuoboshi (bonito flakes).

The word is a portmanteau of okonomi (meaning ‘as you like’, or kinda like the ‘chef’s special’) and yaki (fried) – a fitting name, seeing as how the dish is basically a mix of different ingredients. Different regions in Japan have their own unique versions, but the one that is most common is Osaka-style, where it was popularised. Trivia: okonomiyaki is also nicknamed “Osaka soul food” !

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The shop is cozy, with wooden furniture and a warm, earthen colour scheme. A large section of the restaurant is dominated by the kitchen, which features a teppan (grill). The cooking area is separated from the dining area by glass.

The appeal of such a setup is that guests will be able to sit at the counter and experience the food with all the senses. It almost feels like a performance, as resident chef Takeshi Wada whips up dishes right before your eyes; you smell the aroma of food cooking on the grill, and hear the satisfying sizzle of more ingredients being added to the hotplate.

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For best value, order the set meals, which come with rice, side dishes, miso soup, and dessert. While okonomiyaki is the main attraction, there’s a good selection of other grilled items as well, such as yakiniku (beef), pork belly, and salmon.

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If you’re feeling fancy, opt for premium orders such as the wagyu sirloin and Iberico pork chop.

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Complimentary edamame as appetiser
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Our first order of the day was one of their signatures: Spicy yakisoba (RM20). This was da bomb. The wheat flour noodles were cooked perfectly and had a chewy, al dente texture, each strand coated in a sweet and savoury sauce.

We couldn’t place the unique flavour while we were dining, but I googled it later and apparently the ‘base’ is a Worchestershire sauce, which explains the rich, full-bodied flavour. In terms of freshness, you can’t get any fresher than noodles curling around on the plate like they were wriggling lol, because the heat was making the strands contract. To top it off, shavings of katsuoboshi and dried seaweed flakes.

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Unfortunately, after the star performance of the yakisoba, the okonomiyaki (shrimp and pork – they ran out of squid, so they gave us extra shrimp) felt a little underwhelming. It was still tasty, but the sauces and toppings were very similar in taste to the noodles, but did not pair as well. I also felt that the shredded cabbage had a bitter aftertaste, which sort of ruined the enjoyment for me.

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Last but not least came the fried omelette with pork belly (RM10). The omelette was fluffy and stuffed with tender slices of pork and onions.

Here’s an extremely thoughtful gesture: I ordered one dish, but was surprised to see that two portions came. At first I thought that the server mistakenly keyed in two orders, but it turns out Chef Wada made them so that the Hubs and I would each get an individual portion. Which I think is awesome; that he pays mind to these details. It reminds me of omotenashi, or the Japanese concept of hospitality which centres around going above and beyond to make sure guests are well taken care of.

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That being said, there’s one thing to remember when dining at Okonomi: be patient. During our visit, the shop was at full capacity (about 20 pax). Since Chef Wada was the only one preparing the food, and they are all made to order, our dishes took a long time to get to our table. But hey, good things are worth the wait!

If you want a taste of authentic Osaka-style okonomiyaki, Okonomi checks all the boxes. I do think they make good okonomiyaki – it’s just that I’m not a big fan of the dish itself; it has nothing to do with the chef’s skills.

As for the Hubs and I, we’ve already made plans to return for the phenomenal yakisoba.

OKONOMI BY TOKYO DON

Lot 6 . 24 . 1C, Level 6, Tokyo Street, Pavilion KL, 168, Jln Bukit Bintang, Bukit Bintang, 55100 Kuala Lumpur

Opening hours: 11AM – 9PM (daily)

Rolling Daruma x Olfactory Bulb, Kota Damansara

If you like creative Japanese cuisine, alcoholic desserts, and inventive cocktails, Rolling Daruma x Olfactory Bulb hits all the right spots, served in a cozy setting ideal for intimate get-togethers. The Hubs and I stumbled on this place purely by chance: we were hunting for dinner around Kota Damansara and saw their menu on the sidewalk; our interest piqued by offerings of Japanese tapas, donburis, and ramen.

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Two red darumas greet visitors at the entrance, where the bar is. The space is mostly black and grey, with warm lights and concrete accents, giving it an industrial look. I especially like the decorative cracks on the wall, which are varnished to create a glossy look.

The menu is pretty extensive, but since we were not very hungry, the Hubs and I decided to share a main, a Japas (japanese tapas), and a drink.

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Our choice of Japas was Bourbon-Peach Pulled Pork on Deep-Fried Mantou Bun (RM16), featuring pork shoulder loin, slow cooked til tender for eight hours in balsamic vinegar and peach and bourbon sauce. The taste of the bourbon is mild, but it lends a rich depth to the soft, melt-in-the-mouth pulled pork. The fried mantou is crisp on the edges and soft on the inside, so you have a nice medley of flavours and textures.

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We also got their signature Gyoza Ramen in Sake Pork Bone Broth (RM24). I was expecting the gyoza to be served on the side and was surprised to find them swimming in the soup, which also came with egg, a smattering of seaweed, corn, and spring onions. Some ramen dishes come with rich soup; this was mild but still flavourful, so you don’t feel overwhelmed. The noodles were too soft for my liking, but otherwise this was a decent bowl of ramen.

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No libations for me, but the resto serves plenty of non-alcoholic drinks too such as mocktails and shakes. We got a Salty Yuzie-San (RM16), a refreshing mix of lemon, kaffir lime leaves and yuzu sauce balanced with pandan syrup, brown sugar, and soda water. Perfect for quenching your thirst on a hot day, or just to cut through any greasiness from the food.

Service was friendly with most of the servers, but the one assigned to our table was probably having a bad day because he looked tired and sounded disinterested when taking our orders, and seemed to heave a visible sigh when we requested for an extra bowl. I hope you have a better day, man!

There are still many things we have yet to try at Rolling Daruma x Olfactory Bulb; and I’d like to make a return visit when I’m in the neighbourhood again to try their other items – reviews seem to be stellar for their desserts and coffee.

ROLLING DARUMA X OLFACTORY BULB

15-2, Jalan PJU 5/13 Dataran Sunway, Kota Damansara, Petaling Jaya 47810, Selangor

Phone: 03-61511108

Open: Wed-Fri (5.30PM – 11.30PM), Sat-Sun (11.30AM – 11.30PM). Closed Mondays and Tuesdays

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Uncle Don’s @ IOI Boulevard, Puchong Jaya

Uncle Don’s is a popular resto-bar chain with close to 30 outlets in Peninsula Malaysia. The brand is known for its relatively affordable Western and Asian fusion cuisine, served alongside draught beers and other alcoholic beverages. It also has a catchy tagline, ie “Dine like a Don Everyday!”

There aren’t too many affordable bistro-style eateries around, (the only other one I can think of is The Brew House), so Uncle Don’s outlets are always packed. I hate queuing up for food, so up until now, my first and only experience with the chain was at their SS2 branch, where the food was okay but the service abysmal. But I recently decided to give it another try at their Puchong outlet, which is tucked within IOI Boulevard in Puchong Jaya.

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Uncle Don’s is usually packed in the evenings with office workers grabbing some drinks with colleagues, or youngsters hanging out, so the place is very lively. You can come in the afternoon if you want a bit more breathing space. The Puchong outlet sports the signature Uncle Don’s look — wooden tables, a dark colour scheme, brick walls, and a sleek bar counter.

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The menu is extensive, with a broad selection of appetizers (mostly bites that go well with beer, like buffalo wings, nachos, and keropok), pastas, pizzas, burgers, as well as rice and noodle dishes. Not sure if they employ Filipino chefs, but there is a sole Filipino dish on the menu — sizzling sisig.

The Hubs ordered this, and it came served with rice and a side of keropok and some vegetables. It tasted pretty good, but I think it would have been better if the bits weren’t chopped so fine. Nothing wrong with it of course, just personal preference — because I think bigger bits would have given it a better texture. I also like that they didn’t include mayo, as some versions do (like the one at The Narra).

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My Seafood Maggi Goreng (I requested for no vegetables) was extremely spicy and had me sweating even within the air conditioned premises lol. Nevertheless, the dish was flavourful and they were generous with the portions, and there was a good amount of squid and shrimp with the noodles. Good wok hei as well.

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Both of our meals were part of the set lunches, which came with a choice of soft drinks or iced lemon tea. The set lunches are priced below RM20.

All in all, my second experience at Uncle Don’s was a pretty pleasant one! The service is much better at this outlet as well. I recommend coming for the lunches if you don’t like crowds, and during dinner/supper if you prefer a livelier atmosphere with drinks and music.

UNCLE DON’S (PUCHONG)

19, Jalan Kenari 6, Bandar Puchong Jaya, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Open daily from 12PM – 12AM

uncledons.com.my

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Peri-Peri Chicken @ Nando’s, D’Pulze Cyberjaya

Founded in 1987, Nando’s is a South African restaurant chain specializing in peri-peri style chicken, which has a distinctively tangy taste, thanks to its blend of lemon, pepper, and vinegar used in its marinade. In Malaysia, Nando’s has numerous outlets – including one at D’Pulze Mall in Cyberjaya, where N and I dropped by for lunch recently.

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Just like all its other outlets, the one at Cyberjaya boasts a fun and vibrant design reflecting its South African and Portuguese roots (the Portuguese were one of the first Europeans to land in South Africa. Peri-peri chicken is also a popular dish in Portugal!). The Nando’s logo is a rooster, which is a symbol of Portugal based on the folktale “The Rooster of Barcelos”. Geometric patterns adorn the walls, while the ceilings feature colourful drapery in festive shades.

While the resto looks fairly clean, I think the booth seating can do with a replacement for its covers. The fabric looked worn and there were patches and stains all over them.

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Of course, the chicken is the star here. First, choose the part you like (thigh or breast). Then pick from four levels of spiciness, namely “lemon & herb“, “mild“, “hot“, and “extra hot“; and a selection of sides which include garlic bread, chargrilled vegetables, corn on the cob, wedges, peri-peri chips, coleslaw, Mediterranean rice, and Spicy rice.

N ordered the thigh part with wedges and garlic bread, basted with hot sauce. The portion was humongous, and frankly, would have been enough for the both of us. The chicken was cooked well; it was tender and flavourful, and the hot sauce gave it an extra kick. N liked it and said it would fit well with Filipino taste buds, on account of the lemon/sourness from the vinegar marinade.

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I personally prefer roast chicken from Dave’s Deli, but Nando’s is a pretty solid choice too. It’s especially good if you eat it with their signature sauces, which are also sold by the bottle as condiments.

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I was excited to see Chicken Livers and Portuguese Roll on the menu, because not many places serve chicken livers or even makes them well. The version here is decent; ie the liver has a nice, creamy consistency, and did not have an overly offal-y smell. However, the sauce was EXTREMELY salty. I ended up ordering a bowl of mushroom soup to dip my Portuguese roll in.

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Our meal for two came up to about RM50. Overall, pretty satisfying! You can get a bottomless drink for extra. We were debating if we could just order one drink and share it between the two of us but decided we didn’t want to be assholes. 😛

NANDO’S (Cyberjaya)

 Lot G-25, DPULZE Shopping Centre, Lingkaran Cyber Point Timur, Cyberjaya, 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor

Opening hours: 11AM – 9PM

https://nandos.com.my/

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KL’s Hottest Culinary Playground: Tiffin At The Yard @ Sentul Depot, Kuala Lumpur

Tiffin made its debut back in 2016 as a culinary pop-up called Tiffin Food Court, which ran for a month or two each time at various spots around town. It quickly made a name for itself as ‘the’ hottest makan spot – thanks to its unique “Malaysian food court with a twist” concept, featuring fusion dishes and experimental flavours from some of the country’s top chefs and culinary talents. Tiffin’s event spaces were also a reflection of its crowd (think neon lights and cool art installations) – all catering to a young, urban, and affluent crowd.

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Even a pandemic hasn’t stopped the brand’s growth: it now has a permanent space called Tiffin at the Yard, which covers some 22,000 sq ft of space within the historical Sentul Depot in Kuala Lumpur. Formerly a railway engineering workshop, this 110-year-old heritage building has been revitalized as a lifestyle destination, with Tiffin being its main F&B hub. Visitors can expect 15 rotating and permanent vendors, serving an eclectic mix of offerings the likes of Afro-Carribean, Middle Eastern, and Asian fusion cuisine.

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I’ve been meaning to check this place out since it opened in November 2021, but the crowds were massive from the hype at the time lol. It seems to have thinned a little now, as there were plenty of seats during our visit on a Saturday afternoon.

Not that there’s much to worry about – the space seems to have been designed with social distancing in mind; the seats and stalls are spaced far apart, and there’s plenty of room to move around. The building is enclosed – but the high ceiling and skylights, which allow for good natural lighting, provide a lofty sense of space. Add to that the nicely landscaped trees and greenery within, and it feels like you’re dining in a premium, open-air food court.

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Parts of the depot’s original interior, such as the exposed brick walls and cement flooring, have been preserved, which lends to the whole ‘post industrial’ feel of the place. It’s hip, it’s chic, and it’s very Instagrammable.

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There’s something for every palate here. We wandered around the stalls for some time trying to decide on what to eat (it’s impossible to get everything in one go – which warrants a return visit!). If you’re interested in Afro-Carribean cuisine, KL’s famous Joloko has a spin-off stall here called Jojo’s. Conceptualised as a ‘Carribean beach shack’, expect to find sandwiches called ‘bakes’ with fillings such as jerk-spiced barracuda and carne guisada. Sweet-toothed alcohol lovers will want to pay a stop at Licky Chan for its alcohol-infused treats – and just indulge in their dairy and vegan alcohol-free options.

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For starters, we got some crispy bread and hummus (RM15) from Leen’s, which also serves Middle Eastern favourites such as kebabs and shawarmas. I love hummus and can probably eat it as my only dip for the rest of my life – so this was right up my alley. The crispy bread had the texture of chips/crackers, and was insanely addictive with the hummus.

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Moving on to something a bit more substantial, we ordered Udang Di Sebalik Brioche (RM20) from Red Red Botak Head. The dish’s name is a cheeky play on words on the Malay proverb “ada udang di sebalik batu” (there’s a prawn hiding beneath the rock – which means there’s a hidden plot or something unseen). Picture huge, juicy pieces of shrimp in a creamy, tangy sauce, topped with caramelized onions and sandwiched between a soft and fluffy brioche – and you have the UDSB.

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No points for guessing why the store is called “botak head” (baldie). Chef Liang works the kitchen, and is super friendly (not many chefs crack a smile while they’re working – at least not the ones I’ve encountered lol), and the staff is super warm and friendly as well.

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And finally, the Hubs and I shared a main of crispy noodles with roast duck (RM22) from Halley by Wondermama, which serves dimsum and roasties. The noodles were pretty good and came with bokchoy, egg, plus juicy and flavourful roast duck. I think there was a bit of preserved vegetables in it too which gave the broth a rich flavour and a slightly sour kick.

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Wanted to try TokyoRamen; unfortunately they were still preparing the food and I didn’t want to wait 30 minutes. Another trip then!

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There are many vendors that looked interesting but we didn’t manage to try them all on this visit. Some that caught my eye include The Bao Guys, featuring fluffy mantous sandwiched with everything from fried chicken to braised beef with spicy mala mayo; Taco King and its selection of authentic Mexican tacos; and Olivia’s Deli, which serves Valencian-style paellas. For alcoholic libations, visitors can head to Bar 44, while coffee lovers can indulge in cold brews and lattes from Kopenhagen.

Will definitely plan a return visit some time soon!

PS: All payments here are cashless so have your e wallets and debit/credit cards ready!

TIFFIN AT THE YARD

PT189-PT183-PT185 Jalan Strachan, Off, Jln Ipoh, Sentul, 51100 Kuala Lumpur, Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur (or Waze to Tiffin at the Yard/Sentul Depot). Parking is free.

Opening hours: Thurs – Fri (5PM – 12AM), Sat-Sun (10AM – 12AM).

https://www.tiffin.my/

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Authentic Fish and Chips @ Cor Blimey, SS15 Subang

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It’s been awhile since I last had fish and chips from Cor Blimey — the last time was pre-pandemic, so it has been well over two years!

This is my favourite place for fish and chips as it’s the closest taste-wise to the ones in the UK. Since the Hubs is now here in Malaysia (and a trip to the UK is impossible atm), I brought him along so he could have a taste.

The shop’s interior has not changed much from my last visit: it still boasts a nautical theme with lots of blue and white, dark wooden chairs, and glass table tops with newspaper articles on the fish and chips industry in the UK.

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What makes Cor Blimey’s fish and chips ‘authentic’?

While the dish is not difficult to find in Western restaurants in Malaysia, the versions served locally tend to be bastardized: think breaded (gasp!), with a side of ketchup, cheap mayo, salad and store-bought fries.

Cor Blimey, however, has all the trimmings. At each table you’ll find malt vinegar, salt and pepper seasoning (how they’re traditionally eaten in the UK—although they also have ketchup and chili to cater to local palates), and the seafood is battered instead of breaded.

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We got fried calamari rings (RM15.90) as appetizers. The seafood was fresh, the batter was well done and crispy, and it came served with a tartar sauce dip.

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For the fish and chips, you start with a choice of fish, the most affordable options being Dory (RM25.90), Ocean Perch (RM28.90) and Cherry Snapper (RM30.90). Premium choices include Pacific Halibut (RM42.90), their bestseller the Atlantic Cod (RM47.90), and Haddock (RM49.90). Once you’ve picked your protein, you can then choose the batter (plain, lemon herb, onion garlic, chilli lemon, western curry) and two sides.

We opted for two Ocean Perch, which is descibed as ‘moist, medium-firm and mild-tasting with medium flake’. N had the lemon herb batter with a side of beans and chips, while I had the onion garlic batter with mashed potato. Our orders took awhile to arrive because they fry it fresh to order, but it was worth the wait as they arrived at our table fresh and piping hot!

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Everything was perfect: batter was so crisp, you could hear the crunch from a few tables away; and the fish was moist, flaky, and well seasoned. I’m glad their quality hasn’t changed from the first time I came here, and I hope they maintain it into the future.

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No trip here would be complete without their dips and sauces. In the UK, almost every chippy offers ‘chip shop’ curry dip, which I have yet to find anywhere else in Malaysia other than Cor Blimey. Legend has it that the curry with chips pairing came about in the 1970s, when many chippies were run by Asian families. But don’t expect a spicy kicker – English chippy curry is very much like Japanese curry, which is mild and sweet. I friggin’ love it, though: my friends and I used to go to this place called Chicken Stop back when we were students in Sheffield, and I always doused my chips in curry lol.

Cor Blimey’s other dips such as onion gravy, creamy herb, and garlic mayo (insanely addictive) are great as well.

If seafood isn’t your thing, the resto also serves other traditional British favourites, such as bangers and mash, pickled egg and gherkin, apple berry crumble pie with custard, and deep-fried Mars Bars, which is a Scottish chippy specialty.

COR BLIMEY (SS15)

23, Jalan SS 15/4, Ss 15, 47500 Subang Jaya, Selangor

Open: Tues – Thurs (5pm – 9.30pm), Fri-Sun (12pm – 9.30pm). Closed Mondays

http://www.corblimeymy.com/

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