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Meal for One @ Putien, IOI Mall Puchong – Coastal Fujian Cuisine

I first tried Putien at IOI Mall last year, when we had one of our pandemic lockdowns in KL. As such, I ordered dishes to go and had them with the fam. Everything was pretty good, albeit on the pricey side. A year on, I decided to have another go again – this time dining in solo!

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While not at a ‘fine-dining’ level, Putien’s interior looks fancy, with ambient lights, silkscreens for privacy, and a glass-windowed kitchen where you can watch the chefs in action. I like the blue and gold hues as well, befitting of a restaurant that specializes in coastal Fujian cuisine.

Although their seafood dishes are popular (the steamed yellow croaker is a signature ‘must-try’, according to many recommendations), they also have items such as Drunken Squid, Sweet and Sour Pork with Lychee, Stir-fried Yam, and Chicken in Fermented Red Rice Wine, among others.

Service is also impeccable. Waiters are well trained, professional, and are quick to attend to your every need.

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I ordered two dishes, the braised pork intestines (RM24), and the resto’s signature ‘bian rou’ soup (RM12), to go with a bowl of rice.

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The braised intestines had been meticulously cleaned, so there was no gamey smell typical of innards. It arrived gently simmering with a fire underneath. The intestines had a nice, chewy texture, and I also enjoyed the light, savoury broth that came with it. RM24 is a bit steep for the portion, but there was nothing to complain about taste-wise.

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Some things are best eaten on the spot, and Putien’s bian rou soup is one of them! The last time I had this was for takeaway, and the dumplings were not in tip top shape. This time, I could fully enjoy them as they are meant to.

Wonton wrappers are typically made from wheat flour, but Putien adapts a centuries-old recipe originating from the Qin Dynasty that features thinly pounded meat paste that acts as a substitute for the usual egg/wheat wrapper. The result is a dumpling skin with an unusually springy texture, enveloping juicy pork meat within.

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The soup itself is excellent as well; rich and savoury but not overpowering, concentrated with the lip smacking goodness of meat, seaweed, and spring onions.

Putien’s dishes can be expensive, but they are worth the splurge once in awhile. I especially love the bian rou soup, and can see myself coming back often just to have a bowl of hearty, comforting soup.

PUTIEN (IOI MALL PUCHONG)

G18A, Ground Floor, Jalan Puchong, Bandar Puchong Jaya, 47170 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 11.30AM – 10PM

Menu here

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Fiery Fried Chicken – Choo Choo Chicken, Bandar Puteri Puchong

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Dropping in with a quick ‘mini’ review!

Formerly located at another spot in Bandar Puteri Puchong, Choo Choo Chicken dishes out casual Korean fusion fare, centered around fried chicken, plus offerings such as rice bowls, rice burgers, army stew, and even pasta. The Hubs and I came here for dinner on a weekend some time ago, and spent a nice, quiet evening chatting and watching K-pop videos while burning our tongues over bowls of spicy ramyeon.

The restaurant’s signature is their Korean fried chicken, with 7 different flavours to choose from including soy, creamy garlic, spicy, sweet, and crispy. They’re also known for their Rose Chicken, which is essentially boneless fried chicken paired with cheesy, creamy soup in a bread bowl. Good for sharing, but since it was just the two of us, we opted for individual dishes instead.

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Pro tip when eating greasy food: order something like lemonade or a fizzy drink to help cut through the greasiness! I liked the glass mugs they were served in.

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If you like sweet and spicy flavours, then their Spicy Ramyeon is a good call. The Hubs and I both ordered this, and were soon breathing fire from our mouths. The chicken had a nice texture: very crispy on the outside, thanks to the double-fry technique, and moist and juicy on the inside. The noodles were also cooked al dente, with plenty of springiness. The dish was topped with a smattering of Korean seaweed. It’s one of those unhealthy things that you crave whenever you want something spicy and carb loaded lol.

Prices are range from RM15++ and are standard for an establishment of its kind. But because the resto is pretty quiet most of the time, I think it’s a good choice for when you want to hang out over drinks and food, without having to worry about vacating your seat.

CHOO CHOO CHICKEN (PUCHONG BRANCH)

 G12, Jalan Puteri 2/6, Bandar Puteri, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Open daily: 10.30AM – 10PM

Website

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What to Eat at ICC Pudu Food Court, Kuala Lumpur

The legendary Imbi Market, a wet market that operated in the heart of Kuala Lumpur, was an icon of the city for over 60 years – popular not only as a social and cultural hub, but also for its extraordinary street food.

While the market is long gone, replaced by shiny skyscrapers and bustling commercial centers, vestiges of its glorious culinary days remain – in the form of the food court at ICC Pudu.

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Opened in the 2010s, ICC Pudu was built to provide better, cleaner facilities for the traders of Imbi Market (and also to get them away from that sweet, sweet prime land the old market sat on). Most of the wet market traders, as well as the food stalls, shifted to this new spot, bringing with them six decades of culinary history. Many of these stalls today are still run by second or third generation proprietors, and their clientele also spans generations of families. In recent years, it has also attracted a younger crowd.

Video of the our food trip here!

If you’re averse to dining in humid, stuffy conditions, with sweat pouring down your back as you shout over the din to be heard by your fellow table mates, then this might not be the place for you. If that’s not a problem, then you’ll be well rewarded with the wide variety of cuisine they have on offer, served simple and fuss-free, but with layers of flavour. I recommend coming in a group so you get to try more dishes, as there are at least 20 stalls here, all with their own specialties!

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One of the most popular food stalls here is Ah Weng Koh Hainan Coffee, which serves typical Malaysian breakfast kopitiam fare the likes of soft boiled eggs, coffee and milk tea, and toast with butter and kaya. Because the queue was so long, though, we decided to get drinks from another stall. The taste was not impressive, however, so if you have the time to spare, stick to the OG.

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Next, I ordered a char kuey teow from this stall, which also specializes in lala (clam) noodles. It doesn’t have a name, so here’s a photo for reference.

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The portion was not very large, but enough to satisfy. They were generous with the toppings, with bits of bouncy shrimp and juicy cockles within. The noodles were also cooked over a strong fire, imparting a smoky ‘wok hei‘ taste from the caramelization of sugars and Malliard reactions. While it’s not the best kuey teow I have had, it still scores pretty high on my scale. 8.5/10!

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The Hubs went for the Fish hor fun, from the Special Teow Chew Steam Hor Fun stall. The stall specializes in seafood porridge and seafood noodle soups.

What came to the table was an unusual dish, which I had never seen before. Wide, thick strips of hor fun swam in a golden broth, with fish slices, chilli, tomato, and lemons. Apparently, the dish was inspired by the traditional Teochew steamed fish dish, and is an original creation. I definitely recommend this if you’re coming here!

The noodles are slippery smooth and just slides down your throat, while the fish has all traces of unpleasant ‘fishiness’ removed, thanks to the lemon. The lemon and tomato also give the soup, which has pork bones as a base, a tangy, appetizing taste. None of the ingredients overshadowed each other, but just came together in a perfectly balanced way.

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For snacks, we went for some popiah and pai tee (top hats) from the QQ Penang Popiah stall. It took a long time to get to our table.

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The pai tee and popiah were both decent; the jicama inside was fresh and crispy, with the fried dough pieces wrapped within adding extra crunch. But I wouldn’t say it was worth the more than half an hour we waited for it.

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Last but not least, one cannot come to ICC Pudu and not grab some of the famous Kuih Bakul (nian gao – sticky rice cake) snacks from the Imbi Kuih Bakul stall! There’s always a long queue snaking from the front of the store, but they move quickly, as the cooks churn out batch after batch of golden, fried goodness. Some people prefer the three layer nian gao, where the glutinous rice cake is sandwiched between yam and sweet potato, but I like mine plain as you can bite into the sweet, gooey cake whilst also enjoying the fluffy, crisp batter enveloping it on the outside.

There is so much to eat at ICC Pudu that it would take multiple trips to try everything – but that’s also one of its draws, as no two trips will be the same. Food is affordably priced for the area.

ICC Pudu

Jalan Kijang, Pudu, 55100 Kuala Lumpur

Opening hours: 6am – 2pm (opening hours of individual stalls vary)

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Budget Eats: Soru Station Puchong

With food prices increasing, even noodles and rice at your neighbourhood chap fan stall or kopitiam can be quite pricey, what more cuisine like Western food.

But there are still some good options – if you know where to look.

Newly opened in The Wharf at Taman Tasik Prima is Soru Station, which serves affordable local and Western fare. With humble beginnings as a food truck, business did so well that they opened a few physical branches, the latest being this outlet in Puchong.

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The Hubs and I came here for a quick lunch. Despite being peak hour, the restaurant was not too crowded. The space wasn’t fancy, but it is well ventilated, clean, and comfortable. We made our orders by scanning the QR code menu at our table, then proceeded to the cashier for payment (you can also choose to pay online).

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Our orders were served quickly. Hubs had the Beef Burger (RM9), served with a side of mashed potato. Like many Malay-style burgers, the burger was extremely messy; slathered in a variety of sauces such as tomato, chilli, cheese, and finally a large helping of gravy.

The sauces can be a tad overpowering, but I could still taste the seasonings used in the patty, which was thick and juicy. It reminded me of Otai burgers, actually. Our only qualm was that the dish was a little cold – the patty was probably heated up very quickly on the grill, but everything else wasn’t. Still, for the price, I think it’s good value.

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I went for the nasi lemak ayam crispy (RM8). Again, portions were generous. The rice was good; with hints of ginger and turmeric – but I was a little disappointed with the chicken. It was fried well with a crispy texture, but it was very bland. It didn’t even have the natural flavour of the chicken, which was very odd. The skin had no flavour whatsoever. The saving grace was the sweet and savoury sambal, which went well with the rice (I also used it as a sauce for the chicken). So yeah, some hits and misses. But all in all, I wouldn’t complain, given the price point.

Most of the dishes are priced around RM7 to RM12; and the portions are filling. I wasn’t expecting anything super, so the food was decent enough for me. Service and environment is good as well – so all in all, value for money!

SORU STATION (PUCHONG)

No 8/1, Prima Bizwalk Business Centre, Jalan Tasik Prima 6/2, Taman Tasik Prima, 47150 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 12PM – 12AM (closed Mondays)

https://www.sorustation.com/

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Pasar Malam OUG (OUG Night Market), Kuala Lumpur

With Malaysia in the endemic phase and its borders once again open to tourists, many events and activities have now resumed, including open air night markets. And since it has been close to three years since I last went to one, I dragged the Hubs to the OUG Pasar Malam in KL for a foodie adventure.

Held every Thursday evening from 5pm onwards, this predominantly Malaysian Chinese night market may not be the largest or the most popular, but there are lots of interesting things to see, cheap items for sale, and more importantly, delicious street food.

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We parked at the housing area next to the market and walked a short distance to where bright yellow umbrellas had been set up, the familiar hum of electric generators filling the air. I was surprised to see the sparse crowd (something almost unheard of pre-pandemic, because Malaysians love pasar malams). There seemed to be less stalls as well. I guess the pandemic did take a toll on businesses.

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The market is spread across several streets, but it is not very large, with maybe 50 or 60 stalls at most. Aside from snacks and local fare, you can also find cheap mobile phone cases, accessories, clothing, jewellery, bags, fresh produce, and more.

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Although it was drizzling slightly, it felt nostalgic to be walking around a night market again! Nothing beats the atmosphere of a night market – the smell of food being cooked wafting across the air, the sight of a hawker cooking char kuey teow over a huge flame, sellers shouting to customers to try their goods, thumping Chinese techno music – it’s an experience that you won’t find in the cold, clinical confines of an air-conditioned shopping mall.

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Pro tip for visitors to the Klang Valley – there are pasar malams every day of the week in different areas. Some of the vendors will move to different markets every evening, so you might spot them even when you visit another spot. The major ones are the SS2 pasar malam on Mondays, Taman Connaught pasar malam on Wednesdays, and Setia Alam pasar malam on Saturdays.

While some stalls are unique to their particular pasar malam, you will typically find several that offer similar items. Standard fare at most Malaysian Chinese pasar malams would include fried goodies like salted egg fried chicken, squid, and roast meats. If you’re wondering why there’s an Ultraman on the banner, it’s because “Ultraman” is called “Ham Darn Chew Yun” (literally ‘salted egg superman’ in Cantonese – I guess because the eyes have a similar appearance?).

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Deep fried chicken skin. One does not eat ‘healthy’ at a pasar malam. If you’re looking for that then you’re better off at a salad bar. 😛

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Colourful steamed dumplings.

Like many other things, food prices have also increased at the pasar malam. It is no longer super cheap, but of course, items are still relatively affordable. Just be prepared to shell out a little extra, especially if you’re buying a lot of snacks rather than having one big meal.

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Giant deep fried prawn fritters (har beng), with at least four or five whole prawns in each.

So, what did we get? There were so many options to choose from that we had a hard time picking just a few, and after walking up and down the main street several times, we settled for:

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Lemongrass pork sausages (RM4 each). The meat is minced and blended with lemongrass and chilli, then stuffed into a chewy sausage casing. The flavour was a tad strong for me, but it was tasty nonetheless. The barbecued pork skewers (moo ping – RM4) did not fare as well, as they were almost pure blobs of fat.

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The husband loves crispy apam balik, so we got a bunch of these to try. They were thin, flaky, and sweet, with a generous filling of crushed peanut and corn.

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Another snack I haven’t had in a long time – keropok lekor (fried fish snacks)! These were sold by a Malay auntie, and came in several different varieties. The thin crispy one is great for those who like a bit of crunch, but since I prefer something with more bite, I went for the ‘losong’ (long and cyllindrical). RM2 netted me five pieces. They were nicely fried, crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. But as I munched, I couldn’t help but reminisce about how as a student, just RM1 could get me five pieces of losong, and 10 of the crispy ones. Inflation’s a btch.

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The highlight for us from our trip was these crab-filled mantous, available steamed or deep fried. We got the deep fried ones for RM5 per pop. They were not greasy at all, and the frying gave the bread a crispy texture, while the inside remained soft and fluffy. The filling was generous and flavourful – it reminded me of Singapore chilli crab. So if there’s one thing you have to get at the Pasar Malam OUG, I recommend these!

I was happy to be back at the night market again, and although it’s much less lively these days, it’s still nice to be back enjoying the open-air atmosphere.

PASAR MALAM OUG

Jalan Hujan Emas 4, Taman Overseas Union, 58200 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur

Open every Thursday from 5PM – midnight

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Cafe Yamatatsu, Old Klang Road, Kuala Lumpur

Cafe Yamatatsu is a gem that you have to go hunting for. Originally a pop-up at Kongsi KL, the Japanese-Taiwanese eatery has since moved into permanent quarters just off Old Klang Road’s sixth mile, hidden within a quiet industrial estate.

It was a cloudy Saturday evening, and after missing the turning twice, we finally pulled into a street that looked almost deserted. As we were wondering if this was the right place, Yamatatsu’s distinctive storefront – with Japanese characters emblazoned on traditional noren (banners) – loomed into view. And even though we were early (the store opens at 6PM for dinner service; we were there at 5.45PM), there was already a queue – a testament to the place’s popularity.

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We didn’t have to wait long. A waitress popped out of the shop to take down the number of people in queue, before sliding the wooden door open to reveal a Japanese-style diner, warm and cozy in hues of beige and brown. One side of the space was dedicated to the kitchen and bar, the counter lined with sake bottles; the other featured anime posters on its walls. We were quickly seated and given a QR code menu.

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The menu features a plethora of Japanese and Taiwanese dishes, the likes of braised pork rice, mee suah, udon, oyakodon, and more. But aside from the popular staples, you can also get regional specialties, such as the Creamy Potato Salmon, which is a nostalgic home-cooked favourite in Hokkaido, or Tamago Kake Gohan with natto, featuring a pasteurized egg marinated over soy sauce, and fermented beans. Other unique creations include the Stewed Pork Rib with Corn, and Taiwanese Chicken Chop and Duck Rice, which pairs the iconic Taiwanese deep fried boneless chicken thigh with fatty slices of smoked duck over a bed of rice.

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We ordered an appetizer of Yamatatsu fried chicken (RM11) and two of their recommended dishes: braised pork rice (RM9.50), and chicken over rice (RM9). The prices are a steal, considering the cafe’s setting. Even some kopitiams without air conditioning charge that much these days. Our orders were processed quickly and arrived to the table within minutes.

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The fried chicken is made Japanese-style — that is, extremely crunchy on the outside, thanks to the use of potato starch and a double-fry method. The cuts are from the thigh, so they have a nice, juicy texture. The meat is also well-marinated in soy sauce, giving it a sweet and savoury taste. While karaage is typically served with Japanese mayonnaise, Yamatatsu pairs it with wasabi mayo, which is creamy with a pungent kick: it’ll keep you coming back for more!

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The chicken over rice is a specialty in Chiayi, Taiwan. Tender pieces of shredded chicken are laid atop rice, then drizzled over with fragrant scallion oil and soy sauce. The bowl is served with pickled cucumbers and egg. Simple, but comforting food.

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The star for me at Yamatatsu is their braised pork rice. While this dish is extremely common thanks to the many Taiwanese restaurants we have in the Klang Valley, some places serve the meat minced (gasp!); else, the pork belly is sliced too thickly, or they include pickled vegetables (*which to me spoils the entire bowl. the star is meant to be the pork!).

In my opinion, Yamatatsu’s is the closest you can get to authentic Taiwanese street food: the pork belly is cut into small pieces and braised until it boasts a sticky gelatinous texture. The thick, caramel-like sauce is lip smackingly good, rich and savoury. People who love rice and meat should easily be able to polish off at least two bowls of this!

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For drinks, I went for the Sparkling Honey (RM7.50). It tasted exactly like the carbonated HoneyB brand from Australia; sweet and fizzy, but spruced up with some herbs. It was perfect for cutting through the greasiness of the fried chicken and braised pork.

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Hubs had the Yoghurt Sake (RM20). Had a small sip. I don’t like alcohol so I can’t really judge; it tasted okay to me but not something I would drink on my own volition. The Hubs loved it though, and described it as “interesting, because you can taste both the yoghurt and sake blending together, but you also get the distinctive flavours of each”.

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We left with satisfied tummies and a warm, fuzzy sense of satisfaction.

Their prices are very affordable, portions are generous, and the service is impeccable – the latter is somewhat of a rarity in many F&B outlets in Malaysia – so a big thumbs up to the Yamatatsu team. If you’re planning to stop by for your Japanese/Taiwanese food fix, I suggest coming early to avoid the queue.

CAFE YAMATATSU 山達小舖

30, Jalan 2/131A Project Jaya Industrial Estate, Batu, 6, Jln Klang Lama, 58200 Kuala Lumpur

Open Fridays to Tuesdays (12PM-3PM, 6PM-9.30PM). Closed on Weds and Thurs.

https://www.my-yamatatsu.com/

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Taco Bell, IOI Boulevard Puchong

Growing up, I often wondered what Taco Bell tasted like. What was this Tex-Mex inspired cuisine that Americans seem to enjoy so much in TV series and dramas? This was back in the 90s and 2000s, when Tex-Mex food wasn’t as popular as it is today, and places serving them in Malaysia were few and far between (other than, perhaps, Chili’s).

Since then, Tex-Mex joints have quadrupled, often in the form of food trucks and casual eateries serving burritos, nachos, quesadillas, and the like. With Taco Bell officially making its entry into Malaysia in the last couple of months – and the fanfare it has received – it seems like the era of Tex-Mex is finally coming into its own.

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Recently, The Hubs and I spotted a Taco Bell branch at IOI Boulevard, Puchong – and thought of checking it out. It has been about six months since Taco Bell opened its first outlet, so the hype has died down a little (when it first opened, queues at their Cyberjaya branch lasted hours).

During our visit to the Puchong branch, the shop was busy, but there was still seating available outdoors.

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Bright and cheerful interior packed with a lunch crowd, mostly comprising youngsters and office workers.

The menu features signatures like tacos (both soft and hard shell versions), burritos, rice bowls with beans and vegetables, wraps, and quesadillas. You get to choose from different proteins, such as chicken, beef, and beans. Meals are paired with sides of nachos or fries, and refillable drinks. After you order at the counter, they give you a device that will alert you when your food is ready for collection.

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Our orders: N’s beef burrito with fries, and my chicken quesadilla with nachos.

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My chicken quesadilla was excellent. The tortilla was soft, they were generous with the cheese, and since the meal was served warm, the cheese was still stretchy and oozy, while the chicken meat was tender and juicy. Just a great quesadilla overall. The nachos, which are spiced with what I guess is paprika (?) was crazy addictive. Next time around I might go for the loaded nachos, which are piled high with avocado guacamole, pico de gallo salsa, sour cream, and cheese sauce.

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Bubbly, oozy cheese.

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The Hub’s fries were good too: freshly fried, thick cut, and well seasoned. The burrito was packed to bursting, with moist and juicy beef pairing well with the vegetables.

Overall, I think Taco Bell lives up to its reputation and I can see why it has become such an iconic part of American West Coast food and pop culture. I think it’s also a nice change from our usual fast food joints that serve burgers and fried chicken. Will be back to try their other menu items!

PS: Prices are average for a fast food place; set meals cost around RM15++.

TACO BELL (PUCHONG)

F-21-G, IOI Boulevard Puchong, Jalan Kenari 6, Bandar Puchong Jaya, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 10AM – 11PM

tacobell.com.my

PS: I hope you liked this post! Please consider supporting my blog via Patreon, so I can make more. Or buy me a cup of coffee on Paypal @erisgoesto

Okonomi @ Tokyo Street, Pavilion KL

Another day, another food adventure – this time at Pavilion KL’s Tokyo Street!

Much like J’s Gate Dining at Lot 10 Shopping Centre next door, Tokyo Street houses a slew of Japanese eateries, serving everything from shabu-shabu (hotpot) and sushi, to authentic matcha desserts. We had our sights set on Okonomi, a casual spot specializing in – what else – okonomiyaki.

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For the uninitiated, okonomiyaki is a Japanese savoury pancake, comprising shredded cabbage mixed with batter and items such as pork, shrimp, beef, or even cheese. It is flattened and cooked on a teppan (hotplate) before topping with okonomiyaki sauce, dried seaweed flakes, and katsuoboshi (bonito flakes).

The word is a portmanteau of okonomi (meaning ‘as you like’, or kinda like the ‘chef’s special’) and yaki (fried) – a fitting name, seeing as how the dish is basically a mix of different ingredients. Different regions in Japan have their own unique versions, but the one that is most common is Osaka-style, where it was popularised. Trivia: okonomiyaki is also nicknamed “Osaka soul food” !

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The shop is cozy, with wooden furniture and a warm, earthen colour scheme. A large section of the restaurant is dominated by the kitchen, which features a teppan (grill). The cooking area is separated from the dining area by glass.

The appeal of such a setup is that guests will be able to sit at the counter and experience the food with all the senses. It almost feels like a performance, as resident chef Takeshi Wada whips up dishes right before your eyes; you smell the aroma of food cooking on the grill, and hear the satisfying sizzle of more ingredients being added to the hotplate.

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For best value, order the set meals, which come with rice, side dishes, miso soup, and dessert. While okonomiyaki is the main attraction, there’s a good selection of other grilled items as well, such as yakiniku (beef), pork belly, and salmon.

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If you’re feeling fancy, opt for premium orders such as the wagyu sirloin and Iberico pork chop.

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Complimentary edamame as appetiser
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Our first order of the day was one of their signatures: Spicy yakisoba (RM20). This was da bomb. The wheat flour noodles were cooked perfectly and had a chewy, al dente texture, each strand coated in a sweet and savoury sauce.

We couldn’t place the unique flavour while we were dining, but I googled it later and apparently the ‘base’ is a Worchestershire sauce, which explains the rich, full-bodied flavour. In terms of freshness, you can’t get any fresher than noodles curling around on the plate like they were wriggling lol, because the heat was making the strands contract. To top it off, shavings of katsuoboshi and dried seaweed flakes.

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Unfortunately, after the star performance of the yakisoba, the okonomiyaki (shrimp and pork – they ran out of squid, so they gave us extra shrimp) felt a little underwhelming. It was still tasty, but the sauces and toppings were very similar in taste to the noodles, but did not pair as well. I also felt that the shredded cabbage had a bitter aftertaste, which sort of ruined the enjoyment for me.

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Last but not least came the fried omelette with pork belly (RM10). The omelette was fluffy and stuffed with tender slices of pork and onions.

Here’s an extremely thoughtful gesture: I ordered one dish, but was surprised to see that two portions came. At first I thought that the server mistakenly keyed in two orders, but it turns out Chef Wada made them so that the Hubs and I would each get an individual portion. Which I think is awesome; that he pays mind to these details. It reminds me of omotenashi, or the Japanese concept of hospitality which centres around going above and beyond to make sure guests are well taken care of.

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That being said, there’s one thing to remember when dining at Okonomi: be patient. During our visit, the shop was at full capacity (about 20 pax). Since Chef Wada was the only one preparing the food, and they are all made to order, our dishes took a long time to get to our table. But hey, good things are worth the wait!

If you want a taste of authentic Osaka-style okonomiyaki, Okonomi checks all the boxes. I do think they make good okonomiyaki – it’s just that I’m not a big fan of the dish itself; it has nothing to do with the chef’s skills.

As for the Hubs and I, we’ve already made plans to return for the phenomenal yakisoba.

OKONOMI BY TOKYO DON

Lot 6 . 24 . 1C, Level 6, Tokyo Street, Pavilion KL, 168, Jln Bukit Bintang, Bukit Bintang, 55100 Kuala Lumpur

Opening hours: 11AM – 9PM (daily)