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Review: Ticket To Korea, Setiawalk Puchong

Setiawalk Puchong has seen better days. Once the hottest hangout spot in Puchong, the place has been on a decline, especially in the last few years. There aren’t many restaurants left, but one that has been around since the mall’s inception is Ticket to Korea. Despite having been to Setiawalk many times, I have never thought to try them out — so a recent lunch date with my friend H was as good a time as any.

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The restaurant’s interior is brightly lit by natural sunlight and the space feels cosy and welcoming. A young couple whom I assume to be the owners greeted us enthusiastically, and we were quickly given menus. Aside from authentic Korean fare the likes of bulgogi and pajeon (pancake), diners will also find popular fusion dishes like Korean-style pork ribs with cheese, hot plate cheesy corn, and kimchi quesadilla.

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H ordered a bibimbap bowl, which came in a huge portion — I think it was good enough for two small eaters. It was beautifully presented, with generous heapings of vegetables, grilled pork belly, shredded cucumber, carrots and seaweed, topped off with a fried egg. It was delicious; the sweet and savoury sauce brought everything together really well.

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Despite the sweltering heat outside, I went for the Kimchi Ramen (because I’m masochist that way lol).

The bowl looked fiery red when it came to the table; there were soft slices of tofu swimming within, and the soup’s colour contrasted nicely with the enoki mushrooms and spring onion garnish on top. The soup was the bomb. Some places cut corners and add more kimchi paste, which means you get watery, ‘flavoured’ soup — but with this, I could really taste the texture of fibrous, blended vegetables, and there was a good amount of kimchi within as well. It was thick and sour, perfect for whetting the appetite, and the slight viscosity meant that the soup clung to each strand of ramyeon for maximum flavour. Did I also mention that the pork slices were super tender and had a great ratio of lean and fat?

The owners kept popping by to our table to check if I was okay with the heat. The soup was rather spicy, but hey — what’s pleasure without a bit of pain? *wink wink

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To wash everything down, a cold glass of coffee with condensed milk.
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We had a nice surprise at the end, compliments of the house — ice cream, served on a cold stone plate. They were drizzled over with what tasted like honey, and cookie shavings. Definitely a sweet end to a satisfying meal.

There are lots of good things to say about our dining experience here: the service was impeccable, the dishes that we tried tasted excellent, and prices were not too steep (our meal for two came up to about RM60). I wouldn’t mind a return visit !

PS: They have another branch at Tropicana Avenue, PJ.

TICKET TO KOREA

C-8-1, Block C, Setiawalk, Persiaran Wawasan, Jalan Wawasan 1/1, Taman Wawasan, 47160 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 12PM – 11PM (daily)

facebook.com/tickettokoreafinedining

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Meal for Two: S’mores, Bangsar South

The Moomin’s eye doctor is located at Nexus Bangsar South, so I’ve been hanging around the neighbourhood a lot lately (her eye is much better now, but we’ve been doing follow-ups regularly because it wasn’t healing as quickly as it should due to age).

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On one of these follow-ups, we checked into S’mores for lunch. The place has been around since Nexus opened and touts itself as a “friendly neighbourhood bistro that promises the coldest beers” and “the most authentic charcoal and wood fire cooked western delights”. It was a weekday and the restaurant was packed with office workers, but service was still fast, attentive and friendly. The resto has a nice, chill vibe, a large bar and an al-fresco dining area.

The menu is mostly Western (think pastas, pizzas, ribs and burgers), with some Asian favourites thrown in (nasi lemak, laksa, meehoon). The Moomins and I ordered set lunches (RM16.90++) which came with a drink.

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Smores looks like a great place for a beer or two with colleagues after work
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The Moomin’s Spaghetti Bolognese. Portions were very generous.
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My carbonara spaghetti came in a huge serving, topped with heaps of Parmesan cheese. The pasta was cooked al dente, and it was creamy without being cloying (to me, at least), with generous bits of bacon. Solid dish, no complaints. Those who don’t like rich flavours might want to give it a pass though.

S’MORES

Nexus, Bangsar South, Unit G7, Ground Floor, Jalan Kerinchi, 59200 Kuala Lumpur

Opening hours: 11AM – 12AM (daily)

smores.com.my

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Sushi Zanmai, Main Place Mall USJ

Back when I worked in PJ, I used to frequent Sushi Zanmai at Jaya Shopping Centre, which was just a 10-minute-drive from my office. I went there so often the server could anticipate my order even before I placed it (one plate of fried mushrooms, one bowl of rice and one portion of chuuka idako. Lol.) Unfortunately, I haven’t been back since transitioning to a fully WFH setup, which means that I haven’t had Sushi Zanmai for… well over a year.

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I didn’t realise how much I’ve missed it until I walked past the Sushi Zanmai outlet at Main Place Mall in USJ recently. Of course, memories of my favourite mushroom-rice-octopus combo came flooding back, and I had to stop by for lunch. It was a weekday afternoon so the place was empty and service was fast.

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The aesthetics are pretty standard across all of their outlets – wooden dividers, lots of beige, booth seating for privacy, plush pleather seats, and an open kitchen where you can watch the chefs in action.

I’m a creature of habit, so of course…

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Did you imagine I’d order anything else? lol

For some reason, the chuuka idako (baby octopus) came in a bigger portion than I remembered. Not that I’m complaining. The seafood was well marinated in a savoury sauce that brought out its natural sweetness, enhanced with a sprinkling of sesame and served atop a bed of salad.

One great thing about Sushi Zanmai is the consistent quality between outlets; so you get pretty much the same taste from one outlet as you do at any other.

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Not forgetting my favourite fried shimeji mushrooms, served with a small dollop of Japanese-style mayonnaise. The batter was perfectly crispy and salty, but the mushrooms retained their moistness on the inside.

There’s something about eating fluffy white rice with fried items, be they mushrooms or fried chicken wings; perhaps not the healthiest option, but oh-so-satisfying nonetheless.

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To switch things up beyond my usual trinity of orders (also because I haven’t had Japanese food for some time), I ordered kaki furai (fried oysters) and soft shell crab inari. They did not disappoint; the oysters were fresh, nicely battered and not greasy, while the inari and soft shell crab offered a great blend of textures and sweet and savoury flavours. Solid sushi!

Main Place Mall is much closer to where I live, so I guess I’ll be coming here now whenever I crave my Japanese food fix.

Service is friendly and efficient, prices are above average. If you come on weekends there might be a wait.

SUSHI ZANMAI (MAIN PLACE MALL USJ BRANCH)

Lot No.21, Second Floor, The Main Place, Jalan USJ 21/10, Persiaran Kewajipan, 47630 Subang Jaya, Selangor Darul Ehsan.

Opening hours: 10AM – 10PM

https://www.supersushi.com.my/mainplace.php

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Bug’s Paradise Farm, Puchong – Organic Farm and Cafe by BMS Organics

Organic food has risen in popularity in recent years, as more people adopt a healthier lifestyle – but farm-to-table experiences are still relatively rare in Malaysia, as is awareness to the concept. BMS Organics, a popular local organic food and cafe chain, is aiming to change that – by bringing the experience to urban dwellers.

Video here:

Located within a quiet spot in Kampung Pulau Meranti Puchong, Bugs Paradise Farm is a relatively new endeavor, having opened in the later half of 2020. The compound houses a spacious open-air shop selling organic goods, next to a cafe and a plot of farmland where organic vegetables are grown. There is also an enclosure with small animals like rabbits, chickens and ducks. The cafe serves fusion dishes by day, and steamboat (hotpot) by night. PS: This is a vegetarian cafe, so most of their products are plant-based.

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Parking is free, but note that the parking area is not paved and spots are limited.
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The fam and I visited on a weekend and the place was not too busy. Most of the visitors were families with young children. There is plenty of space, so definitely a better option than crowded shopping malls. The cafe itself is a simple structure with attap roofing, which gives the place a rustic feel. The ceilings are high, so even though there is no air-conditioning, it’s quite cooling even in the afternoon.

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Kiosks serving hot cocoa and drinks, although these were not open during our visit.
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The menu has a variety of dishes, including rice and porridge meals, noodles and spaghetti, poke bowls and appetisers. Prices range from RM15-RM25 for mains.

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Visitors can go on farm tours, where a guide will share knowledge on organic farming and take visitors on a stroll around the farm, followed by lunch at the cafe. Pre-bookings are required. (RM38 per pax)

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Organic food lovers will be thrilled as there are lots of products available at the shop, from organic soybeans, quinoa and tri-millet, to fresh vegetables, kombucha, sauces, jams, and more. There’s also a frozen food section where you can buy pre-packed food that you can cook at home.

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As for the cafe, we had a hiccup during our visit. Orders are made by scanning a QR code, but for some reason, they did not register in the system. We ended up going to the counter, where the staff manually keyed in each dish into the computer.

Even so, there was still a mix-up, and all the dishes that came to our table were the wrong orders. The kitchen had to make our dishes again from scratch, and we had to wait about 50 minutes to an hour for them to arrive. It didn’t help when other people who arrived to the cafe later than us got their orders first. We inquired with one of the waitstaff, who took the receipt we had and disappeared to the back of the resto for a long time.

I think it was genuinely a computer error and miscommunication, as the items printed on the receipt were correct, but the orders came out wrong. Still, it would have been nice if they had communicated the situation/updated us on the status of our dishes, rather than have us wait for an hour unsure if we should remind them again in case they had forgotten our orders.

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Mom’s Herbal Soup with Yee Mee (RM16.90), which came served in a claypot. The soup had a good amount of red dates and wolfberries in it.

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Pops’ Herbal Soup with Multigrain Rice (RM15.90). You can opt to change to cauliflower rice at an additional charge.

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I ordered the Lion’s Mane Mushroom Wrap, which is essentially a vegan burrito. Inside was fresh lettuce, carrots, purple cabbage and mushrooms plus a creamy sesame sauce, which bound all the elements together. I don’t like vegetables in general, but these were fresh, sweet and crunchy, and the mushrooms had a nice meat-like texture to them.

Also got two half-boiled asthaxanthin eggs (not pictured). Asthaxanthin is an antioxidant that is present in many types of sea creatures like salmon, crabs, lobsters and shrimp, and is purported to have health benefits such as boosting the immune system and cardiovascular health. Chicken feed is mixed with it to get eggs rich in asthaxanthin – which is a good option for vegetarians who can’t consume seafood.

PS: When we made payment, the cafe gave us a free packet of veggies as an apology for the mix-up with our orders, which was a nice gesture.

Bug’s Paradise Farm is a good place to visit, especially now that interstate travel isn’t yet allowed due to the pandemic. Aside from the issue I mentioned above, which I think they tried their best to rectify, I enjoyed my time there. The food is slightly more expensive, but that is to be expected for organic ingredients. The location isn’t ideal, since it’s in an area surrounded by factories, but the fencing around the plot helps to block out the view.

Bookings for farm tours can be made here. Tours are in Mandarin or English.

GETTING THERE

Bugs Paradise Farm is located at Lot 46692, Jalan Pulau Meranti, Kampung Pulau Meranti, 47120 Puchong, Selangor. It is a 20 minute drive from the Puchong city centre (IOI Mall area), and about 20 minutes from Cyberjaya. Opens 12PM – 10PM from Wednesdays to Fridays, and 10AM – 10PM on weekends. Closed Mon – Tues.

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Your Guide To Different Types of Dimsum

Growing up, my favourite part about weekend mornings was when my parents brought me out for a dimsum breakfast. I loved the hustle and bustle of the dining floor, filled with the chatter of patrons and the clink of plates and chopsticks. I loved the towering baskets of bamboo steamers piled up high on carts that were wheeled to each table, where diners got to pick out their favourite items. But most of all, I loved savouring the dimsum itself: delicious bite-sized morsels that are either steamed, fried or baked. It’s no wonder the literal translation for dimsum is ‘touch the heart’! 

As an adult, I still love dimsum, and even though the pandemic has changed the way we dine, I still find myself getting dimsum for takeaway every now and then to satisfy my cravings. 

For those unfamiliar with Cantonese cuisine, ordering dim sum can feel like a daunting task, what with the bewildering array of choices available. But fret not: here’s a handy dimsum guide that will help you to tell your siew mai apart from your siew loong bao (and perhaps impress your Cantonese friends while you’re at!) 

**Spellings may differ slightly depending on which country you’re from; I’m using the versions most common to where I live. Also, I’ve only listed 12 types; otherwise this would turn into a compendium lol. 

Har Gao 

Matt @ PEK, CC BY-SA 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

You can’t go to a dimsum resto and not order a basket of har gao. These shrimp dumplings are distinguished by their slightly translucent wrapper and delicate pleats. The wrapper is made from rice flour, which gives it a slightly chewy texture that contrasts perfectly with the juicy, crunchy shrimps enveloped within. A good har gao should not stick to the bottom of the steamer, and the skin should be thin enough to see-through, but thick enough that it doesn’t break when you lift it with your chopsticks. 

Siew Mai 

Blenpeams, CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Next to har gao, siew mai is another must-have at every table. Like the har gao, the siew mai is also a ‘dumpling’, but a different kind altogether. The filling typically contains ground pork and whole or chopped shrimp, sometimes paired with ingredients such as mushrooms, chives, bamboo shoots or water chestnuts (for that added crunch). The wrapper is made from lye dough and is either yellow or white; sometimes it has a slightly sweet taste. To garnish, crab roe or diced carrot is used to form a dot at the top of the dumpling. 

Char Siew Bao 

Takeaway, CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

These barbecued pork buns are my husband’s favourite. In the Philippines, where the hubs is from, they are known as siopao, and the pork filling is usually red in colour. Here in Malaysia, a dark filling is more common; although tastewise, I think they are quite similar. The filling is savoury with a hint of sweetness, thanks to the marinade of oyster sauce, soy sauce, sugar and roasted sesame seed oil. 

Although char siew bao looks similar to baozi (traditional Chinese steamed buns), the texture of the former is different, as the dough uses yeast and baking powder as leavening, making it dense but fluffy. 

Siew Loong Bao 

While the name means ‘mini basket buns’, siew loong bao (or xiaolongbao) are actually soup dumplings. Traditionally a dish from Jiangsu, it is often associated with Shanghainese cuisine. The dumplings are also very popular in Taiwan, thanks to brands like Din Tai Fung, who have also popularised it in the West, so much so that they are sometimes called Taiwanese soup dumplings. 

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So, how does one fill a dumpling with soup? Chefs use a solid meat aspic (sort of like a gelatin cube), which they stuff together with ground pork into the thin wrapper before steaming. The heat from the cooking process then melts the aspic, creating a savoury soup. There’s supposed to be a ‘proper’ way to eat siew loong bao; ie you poke a hole in the skin, slurp up the soup, put a couple of ginger slices on then dip it into vinegar before consuming whole – but I say food is to be enjoyed, so eat it as you like. Just don’t burn your tongue on hot soup! 

Fung Jao (Phoenix Talons) 

A lofty name for chicken feet braised with black bean sauce. Some consider it a delicacy, and if you’re not used to eating parts like feet, this dish might be a tad … adventurous. The black bean sauce is savoury and sweet, masking any unpleasant odours. There’s not much meat on the feet, but plenty of skin, cartilage and tendons, so if you enjoy gelatinous textures, then dig in. If you’re really skilled, take a big bite – then elegantly spit out the small bones. 

Har Guen 

Since Canton (Guangdong) is close to the sea, a lot of dishes in Cantonese cuisine use seafood. Har Guen, or fried shrimp rolls, is one of them. Shrimps are wrapped with dried beancurd sheets (fu pei) into rolls, then deep fried to crispy perfection. To suit modern tastes, dimsum shops often serve them with dips like mayonnaise and garlic chilli sauce. 

Chee Cheong Fun 

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Many dimsum items are bite-sized, so if you’re looking for something more substantial, there’s chee cheong fun, ie steamed rice noodle rolls. The name actually means ‘pig intestine noodles’, since they look like pig intestines. Chee cheong fun starts off as a ‘sheet’: a mixture of rice flour, tapioca or glutinous rice flour plus water is poured over a special flat pan. The heat causes it to solidify;  it is then rolled into its signature long shape and sliced. The noodles are very versatile, and different places serve different versions, but the ones you find at dimsum shops are usually served plain and drizzled over with soy sauce, or stuffed with shrimp (no surprise) or barbecued pork. Here in Malaysia, dimsum restos often add sambal or chilli on top. 

Lo Mai Gai 

brown_colour, CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

My dad and brother are typical Asians. Rice is a must have at every meal, which is why they always order this glutinous rice dish whenever we have dimsum. Traditionally, the rice, together with ingredients like mushroom, Chinese sausage and pork is wrapped in a lotus leaf and steamed, giving it a fragrant aroma – but modern versions use an aluminium foil bowl so that it’s easier to remove (sourcing for lotus leaves is probably an expensive endeavour too). The rice has a chewy texture with a sticky ‘glaze’ to it. 

Lo Bak Go

jasonlam, CC BY-SA 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

“Lo bak” refers to carrots, but these savoury ‘cakes’ are actually made from Chinese radish. Water, rice flour and starch is added to mashed radish roots to form squares, which are then deep fried. Sometimes ingredients like dried shrimp, dried mushrooms, Chinese sausage and jinhua ham are added to give it more flavour. The starch/flour gives the cakes a crisp, brown coating, whilst retaining a soft but solid consistency throughout. Chao lo bak go is essentially the same, but stir fried with vegetables like bean sprouts and chilli instead of deep fried. 

Lao Sar Bao 

My personal favourite, lao sar bao (molten lava bun) is a relatively new creation to grace the menus of dim sum restaurants. Popularised in recent years due to the salted egg yolk custard craze, these steamed buns are soft and fluffy with a sweet and creamy filling of mashed salted egg yolks. The filling is a wonderful balance between sweet and salty, and although it has a sandy texture on the tongue (due to the egg yolk mash), it still slides down your throat effortlessly. There’s almost a sensual quality when you tear the buns apart and watch as the filling oozes out. Hmmh. 

Wu Kok 

Haha169, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Deep fried yam puffs? Comfort food at its best. The pastry has a croquette-like texture, in that it’s flaky and crumbly rather than firm like other types of deep fried dumplings. At first bite, you get a light and crispy texture on the outside, before moving on to the smooth, paste-like consistency of the yam. Finally, there’s the juicy centre of moist pork and vegetables. 

Daan Tat 

Of course, we can’t round off the meal without dessert. Dan taat, or Cantonese egg tarts are inspired by English tarts and the Portuguese pastel de nata; a vestige of British colonial influence in Canton / Hong Kong, as well as Portuguese influence in Macao. While dan taat isn’t traditional dimsum per se (it was only sold beginning the early 20th century), it is a staple on many dimsum restaurant menus today, as well as in Hong Kong-style char chaan tengs (coffeeshops). Making the pastry is tedious process, as it requires multiple folding to get that flaky texture, and a careful baking process to ensure the custard is perfect. I can’t imagine a more fitting dessert to end a dim sum feast. 

And there you have it! This is by no means a comprehensive guide: there are literally dozens if not over a hundred different types of dimsum, some of which even I have not tasted before. But hopefully, if  you haven’t been to a dimsum resto before, this will give you a better idea of some dishes to order and make the experience less intimidating. 

Happy feasting! 

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Meal for One: Gangnam 88 @ Setiawalk Puchong

I can’t believe it has been three years since I last dined at Gangnam 88 at Setiawalk Puchong – I’m surprised the place is still surviving. It has nothing to do with their food, which is pretty decent – it’s just that Setiawalk is so dead these days, you’ll be hard-pressed to find restaurants that are still open. A far cry from its glory days when the place was thriving with restos and bars.

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The decor and menu has not changed much since my last visit: it still looks bright, cheerful and warm, with lots of Korean-themed decor adorning the walls, and the customary K-pop videos playing on TV.

Most of the items they serve are meant for sharing, like the BBQ platters, Korean fried chicken, stews and such. For lunch, they have individual rice and noodle dishes, as well as lunch sets which come with refillable banchan (sides).

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I had the Ramyeon with Cheese (RM16), which was served with the usual sides like pickled vegetables, kimchi, fishcakes and tofu. Ramyeon was a tad overcooked so the noodles were too soft, and the soup was too diluted, so it was a quite disappointing. Still, if you’re in the area and looking for Korean food, this is one of the only ones around aside from Ticket to Korea, and I think that they do serve some pretty decent BBQ.

GANGNAM 88 (PUCHONG)

I-2-G, Setiawalk, Persiaran Wawasan,, Pusat Bandar Puchong, 47160 Puchong, Selangor Darul Ehsan

Opening hours: 11AM – 12AM (daily)

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Burgers, Wings and American Fare @ Mean Mince, Mutiara Damansara

Mention Mutiara Damansara and most will think of IKEA and The Curve – but venture further in to the housing area and you’ll find a hidden gem, tucked within a quiet suburban spot just next to the Mutiara Damansara police station. Opened two years ago, Mean Mince dishes out American fare the likes of juicy burgers, wings, onion rings and deep dish pizzas, and has made a name for itself among burger fans for its unique deep fried burger.

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The shop is appropriately Americana-themed, with American license plates and black and white photos of New York and the San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge, while the speakers blast diner music. Plenty of natural sunlight makes for a cheerful, well-lit interior, and the ‘bar’ (setup looks like one but they don’t serve alcohol) is lined with rows of soda bottles. 

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The restaurant’s specialties are its burgers, in particular the deep fried burger – but I didn’t feel like having one so I ordered some snacks instead. I have read rave reviews about the burgers though, so might be back again to try them!

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They give you a small bucket of light popcorn to munch on while you wait for your order.

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The Very Vanilla Shake (RM10) was done right – thick, sweet and cold, they don’t skimp on the ingredients. Perfect with fried finger food, or to wash down your burgers and onion rings.

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Their Buffalo Wings comes highly recommended. For just RM13.90, you get six pieces of succulent, deep fried to perfection wings, coated in a sour and spicy buffalo sauce and served with blue cheese aioli. The wings are literal perfection: crispy on the outside and juicy on the inside. The sauce is what really makes the dish pop, though – I’ve had buffalo wings at many places in Malaysia, and they somehow can’t live up to the ones I’ve had at BWW in LA. The ones at Mean Mince taste authentic.

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Also, the main reason I came to check the place out: Mozzarella sticks (RM13.90). I’ve been craving mozzarella sticks for several weeks now and Mean Mince turned up in my search while I was googling for places that sold them in PJ. Again, portions are very generous – the cheese is almost bursting out of its batter, and the tangy tomato salsa that comes with it helps to cut through the heaviness.

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Gotta do that cheese pull

Overall, Mean Mince is a great place for American food, and the service is fast and friendly. Will be making a return visit for the burgers!

MEAN MINCE

31-1, Jalan PJU 7/16A, Mutiara Damansara, Petaling Jaya, Selangor

Opening hours: 12pm – 9pm (Thurs – Tuesdays). Closed Wednesdays.

Telephone: 03-7733-2512

facebook.com/meanmince

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Celebrate the Festive Season at Hilton Kuala Lumpur With Scrumptious Feasts

Christmas is a time for friends and family – and although the pandemic might have changed the way we celebrate, that doesn’t mean we can’t keep the spirit alive, or show thoughtfulness, gratitude and love to the ones that matter in our lives. 

This festive season, Hilton Kuala Lumpur presents the Joy of Giving with heart-warming feasts and gift boxes. All of the festive menus are designed to be shared and savoured together – because more than the usual fixtures of the holiday season (delicious food, beautiful decorations, gifts) it’s the people you experience it with that make the occasion truly memorable.  

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Hilton KL’s Festive Gift Boxes make an ideal surprise for friends, family and business associates. Starting from RM180 nett, the gift box comes with delectable homemade treats like fruit cake, chocolate pralines, chocolate Santa, cookies and Stollen, alongside spa and F&B vouchers to complement the personalised touch. There is the option to takeaway and dine in the comfort of your home on selected items with Bring Hilton Home. 

For those who are able to travel and are keen on experiencing a Hilton Christmas first hand, Hilton KL will be hosting a 20-foot-tall Christmas tree at the Lobby, adorned with ribbons and ornaments to celebrate the festive season in style. Plenty of gastronomic pleasures also await, with a dedicated culinary team keen to bring to guests the world on a plate – all while keeping strictly to SOPs to ensure a safe dining experience. 

Christmas Lunch & Dinner at Vasco’s

Take your taste buds on a gastronomic journey with a curated selection of local and international feasts that celebrate the joyous season. Prepared by an award-winning culinary team, expect festive dishes that you won’t get at any other time of the year, such as Boston Lobster Mornay, Honey Glazed Spice Brined Roast Turkey with Cranberry Sauce and Grass-fed Australian Beef Sirloin Mini Steak. Other Christmas specialties to look forward to include Wagyu Beef Scotch Egg with Hollaindaise, Crisp Duck Leg Confit and Waffle with Mustard Maple Syrup, Salt-crusted Salmon Trout with Fennel, Signature Yule Log, Pan-fried Stolen with Berries and Homemade Blackcurrant Ice Cream and more. 

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The Christmas Eve Dinner Buffet on 24 December 2020 (6.30pm – 10.30pm) is priced at RM248 nett per person. Lunch and dinner buffets on Christmas Day are also available, priced at RM248 nett and RM228 nett per person, respectively.  

You can also usher in the New Year with a Seafood Galore buffet on New Year’s Eve, priced at RM248 nett per person, or enjoy lunch and dinner on New Year’s Day at RM228 and RM188 nett, respectively. 

Special London Duck at Chynna

Known as the ‘wagyu of duck’, the London Roast Duck was popularised by Cantonese immigrants to the UK, making a name for itself as an iconic dish of the city. The good news is you won’t have to travel all the way to London to get it, as celebrity Chef Lam Hock Hin works his culinary magic to present Chynna’s immaculate version; the duck’s smooth texture and succulent flesh sure to leave the most discerning appetites craving for more. In addition, diners can dig into his Cantonese-inspired turkey creations such as Pan-Fried Turkey Meat with Thyme Leaf, Turkey Dumpling with Black Truffle and Hot & Sour Soup with Shredded Turkey, which displays a masterful grasp of classic meets modern cooking. 

Chef Lam’s Special London Duck is available for order from 1 – 31 December 2020, from 12 to 2.30pm and 6 pm to 10.30pm. Price start from RM159. 

Grilled Festive Specialties at Chambers Grill 

Traditionally, meat is a quintessential part of many Christmas celebrations around the world. Chambers Grill’s Festive Carnivore Platter is sure to satisfy meat lovers, with highlights such as Monster “Bull Head” Steak, Lamb Cutlets, Black Angus Prime Rib Butterflied, Port Wine Braised Australian Beef Cheek and Turkey Roulade stuffed with Mushroom and Chestnuts. Plus, there’s a show-stopping Flambé Traditional Pudding with Brandy Sauce to cap off a convivial evening. 

The platter is good for three to four persons. It is available from 1 – 31 December from 6pm to 10.30pm, and is priced from RM800. 

Delectable Japanese Flavours at Iketeru

There’s no rule book that Christmas has to be about turkeys and log cakes – give your festive spirit a twist and experience authentic Japanese fare at Iketeru. Prepared with the freshest seasonal ingredients, Iketeru will serve two types of tantalizing 6-course menu, namely ‘Wafu Set’ and ‘Yofu Set’ to indulge the palates. Enjoy dishes like Smoked Duck Salad, Wagyu Beef Teppanyaki, Buri Teriyaki, Nigiri Sushi, Assorted Tempura and more. 

The festive set menu is available from 1 to 31 December 2020 from 12pm – 2.30pm, and 6pm – 10.30pm. Prices from RM360. 

Glorious Family-Style Feast at Graze

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Gather friends and family over a spread of rustic-themed epicurean delight at Graze on Christmas Day, as you exchange meaningful conversations (and presents!) with each other. The 12-course menu includes Freshly Shucked Irish Tragheanna Oyster, Tiger Prawn Cocktail, Chestnut Soup with Cranberry Cream Fraiche, Lobster Mornay with Truffle Fries and more. Cut through the meat and seafood with unlimited servings of Caesar Salad. Complete the experience with indulgent sweets and cheese like Hazelnut Mud Cake, Christmas pudding with Brandied Anglaise, Gorgonzola Blue Cheese, and French Brie Cheese served with dried fruits.

The Christmas Day Brunch is available from 11am – 2.30pm from RM268 per person.

Toast to Brilliant Beginnings at Aviary Bar 

Sidle up to Aviary Bar and revel in the year-end festivities with bespoke cocktails crafted by award-winning mixologists. Indulge in a ‘Ring the Bell’ cocktail (RM50 nett per glass), made with Glenlivet Founder’s Reserve and peach liquor, and for the non-alcoholic drinkers, there’s the ‘Peachy Santa’ mocktail (RM35 nett per glass) a bright and fruity concoction that adds festive cheer to any celebration. Guests can order these festive beverages at the bar from 1 to 31 December, from 12 pm to 10pm. 

A Sip of Joy at Oro Café 

Malaysia may not have winters, but the recent rainy season has been pretty cold. Warm up with some classic Christmas Eggnog at Oro Cafe, or order one of their signature concoctions like The Grinch Punch and Pomegranate Spiced Tea, for a burst of fragrant smells and flavours of exotic spices. Make a loved one’s day with a heartwarming takeaway gift box, and choose from either Santa’s Turkey Box which features Roast Turkey with a side of salads, baked vegetables, cranberry sauce and desserts or Festive Gift Boxes which comprise a medley of homemade pastry delights.  

Festive beverages are available from 1 – 31 December 2020 from 12pm – 10pm at RM35 nett per glass, while the Festive Gift and Takeaway Boxes are available from now until 31 December 2020 at RM180 nett. Festive Goodies are priced at RM40 nett. 

Festive Tea Time at The Lounge

Themed ‘Spirit of Joy’, The Lounge offers a high tea menu for guests to indulge themselves in food haven this holiday season. The Festive Afternoon High Tea Set includes a plethora of handcrafted desserts and savouries, including Turkey Cranberry Swiss Cheese Finger Sandwich, Chocolate & Cinnamon Orange Cake, Spiced Mango Éclair, Christmas Plum Pudding with Chocolate Raspberry Mousse and more, served with Pomegranate Spiced Tea. With a majestic view of KL city, this is a perfect opportunity for a glamorous and intimate tête-à-tête session alongside your friends or partner. 

The Festive High Tea is available from 1 to 31 December 2020, from 2.30pm – 5.30pm on weekdays and 12.30pm – 5.30pm on weekends, priced at RM250 nett for two persons. 

For enquiries or reservations, call +603 2264 2264, or email KULHI_CustomerServce@hilton.com, or visit http://www.eatdrinkhilton.com. 

*Photos courtesy of Hilton Kuala Lumpur.

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