Treat Mum to a Five-Star Meal This Mother’s Day with These Round the World Recipes

Staying at home doesn’t mean that Mother’s Day celebrations have to be dim and boring. If anything, this is a great time to bond and do something thoughtful for mum, rather than the usual eating out at a fancy restaurant, or buying her an expensive gift. Better still, whip up dishes worthy of any five-star establishment with these quality recipes, shared by chefs from luxury hotels and restaurants around the world.

*Photos and recipes courtesy of respective restaurants and hotels. 

FOR THE MUM WHO LOVES DIM SUM 

Spring is in full bloom – and while a trip to Japan might be a no go, you can bring the beautiful cherry blossoms to mum in the form of Sui Tang Li‘s mouth-watering Cherry Blossom Dumplings. This restaurant at The Middle House is known for its vibrant menu inspired by Cantonese, Sichuan and Shanghainese delicacies. Made with beetroot, asparagus, winter bamboo shoots, mushrooms and shrimp, these Cherry Blossom Dumplings by Chef Tony is the perfect dish to surprise any dim sum-loving mum with.

Cherry Blossom Dumplings 2

Ingredients:

  • Wheat starch: 60g
  • Corn starch: 60g
  • Beetroot: 50g
  • Asparagus: 30g
  • Winter bamboo shoots: 30g
  • Mushroom: 30g
  • Shrimp: 300g
  • Egg: 3
  • Lard oil: 40g

Method (Video)

FOR THE MUM WHO ENJOYS CHINESE CUISINE 

If mum prefers the savoury and spicy flavours of Chinese cuisine, try these three recipes from Jing Yaa Tang, the Opposite House Beijing’s one-Michelin star restaurant.

Kung Pao Chicken

Kung pao chicken 𨱣º¶∂°2

Ingredients:

  • Chicken thigh : 20g
  • Diced green onion: 50g
  • Cooked peanuts: 25g
  • Cooked cashew nuts : 25g
  • Sliced garlic : 5g
  • Sliced ginger: 5g
  • Dried chilli : 5g

Seasoning: 

  • (A) Salt (2g), rice wine (5g), sugar (1g), egg (1/3), corn flour (6g)
  • (B) Sugar (30g), salt (3g), rice vinegar (50g), corn flour (10g)

Method:

  1. Mix and pickle the diced chicken thigh with seasoning (A).
  2. Heat the oil in a heated wok, then fry the pickled chicken and diced green onion until the chicken is cooked.
  3. Lightly fry the sliced garlic and ginger and dried chilli.
  4. Add cooked chicken and onion, and then stir-fry the cooked peanuts, cashew nuts and seasoning (B).

Tips:

  1. Cook the fried chicken and diced onion for one minute to elevate the taste.
  2. Turn off the fire when adding the peanuts and cashew nuts to keep them crispy.

Mapo Tofu

Mushroom mapo tofu ¬È∆≈∂π∏Ø

Main ingredients:

  • Tofu (1pc)
  • Minced beef 50g

Ingredients:

  • Scallion 5g
  • Minced ginger 5g
  • Spring onion 5g
  • Fermented Soy bean 20g
  • Sugar 5g
  • Sesame oil 8g
  • Chili oil 8g
  • Rice wine 5g
  • Soy sauce 25g
  • Soy bean paste: 15g
  • Chili powder 8g
  • Sichuan peppercorn chili powder 3g

Method:

  1. Cut tofu into 3 cm cubes, boil with hot water for 5 minutes.
  2. Fry the minced beef until golden brown
  3. Fry ginger, scallion, soybean paste, chilli powder. Add tofu, rice wine and water until it covers 2/3 of the tofu. Add sugar, soy sauce and half of the minced beef, cook with low heat for 5 minutes, reduce the sauce and add fermented soybean, stir fry it for 2 minutes.
  4. Plate it and add another half of the minced beef, sprinkle the spring onion and Sichuan peppercorn chilli powder.

Braised beef brisket with potatoes 

Braised beef brisket with potatoes Õ¡∂π…’≈£ÎÓ (1)

Main ingredient: (for 4pax)

  • Beef brisket : 1.6kg
  • Potatoes: 600g

Ingredients:

  • seafood sauce: 65g
  • Oyster sauce: 65g
  • Rice wine: 30g
  • Bean paste: 16g
  • Soy sauce: 32g
  • Icing sugar: 24g
  • Ginger slice: 80g
  • Leek: 1 stem
  • Spice bag: 1

Method:

  1. Cut the beef brisket into 4cm squares, boil them for 5-8 minutes.
  2. Fry the ginger slice until golden
  3. Fry the leek until golden
  4. Fry the seafood sauce and add beef brisket until fragrant; add water until it covers the beef, then add spice bag, oyster sauce, soy sauce and a bit salt. Turn to low heat and stew for 2-2.5 hours.
  5. Skin potatoes, deep fry until golden, add into the beef stew and reduce the sauce.

Tips:

  1. Don’t add extra water when stewing the beef.
  2. When reducing the sauce, use low heat so the beef and potatoes can absorb the sauce better

FOR THE MUM WHO’S SHRIMPLY THE BEST 

Mums who love seafood will be absolutely thrilled by Capella Singapore’s Prawn Aglio Olio.  Inspired by the traditional Napoli pasta dish , it is perfumed with aromatic garlic and olive oil, and brought to life with white wine, cloves of garlic and delicious chicken stock.

Prawn Aglio Olio Pasta1

Ingredients 

  • 5pcs Prawn
  • 150g Linguini
  • 10g Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 clove Garlic, Minced
  • ¼ cup Chicken Stock
  • Chilli Flakes
  • White Pepper Powder
  • Salt to taste
  • Italian Parsley

Method
1.Bring a large pot of water to boil. Season water with salt and add in the linguine. Drain and set aside.
2. Using a pan and medium heat, add olive oil and sear prawns until they are cooked on both sides.
3. Add in garlic, followed by chilli flakes.
4. Stirring frequently, add in white wine to deglaze, followed by chicken stock.
5. Add linguine to the sauce. Add white pepper powder and salt to taste. Toss well.
6.Serve with Italian parsley as garnish.

FOR THE MUM WITH A SWEET TOOTH 

If you’re looking for dessert to finish things off on a sweet note, Singita’s indulgent Double-Baked Flourless Chocolate Meringue Cake, or Feast at EAST, Hong Kong’s Raspberry Butter Cake made with fresh raspberries and jam is sure to seal the deal.

Raspberry Butter Cake ingredients and method: 

Singita’s Double-Baked Flourless Chocolate Meringue Cake

Singita Flourless Double Chocolate Meringue Cake

Ingredients for the cake 

  • 250g butter
  • 350g dark chocolate
  • 300g brown sugar
  • 5 eggs, separated

Ingredients for the meringue

  • 4 egg whites
  • 225g caster sugar
  • 10ml vanilla essence
  • 5ml cornflour
  • 50g cocoa powder

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees.Line a 20cm x 30cm x 5cm baking pan with baking paper
  2. Melt butter, chocolate and sugar together, stirring until the sugar has dissolved
  3. Remove from heat and mix in the egg yolks
  4. Whisk egg whites until stiff peaks form, then fold into the chocolate mixture
  5. Pour the mixture into the tin and bake for 40 minutes
  6. Then make the meringues by whisking egg whites, adding a little caster sugar at a time and then the vanilla essence until stiff peaks form
  7. In a separate bowl, sift cornflour and cocoa powder together and fold into the meringue
  8. Remove the chocolate cake from oven and reduce the temperature to 120 degrees
  9. Top the cake with the meringue and return to oven for 25 minutes. Leave to cool on a wire rack.

Facebook Group “Masak Apa Tak Jadi Hari Ini” Entertains Malaysians With Cooking Fails During the MCO

Hey guys! It’s currently day 40 of the Movement Control Order here in Malaysia. Until the quarantine started, I had no idea I had this many Masterchefs in my friends’ list – judging from all the delicious-looking homemade food they’ve been posting or pictures of 3-ingredient cakes and Dalgona coffee lol.

What most people don’t post, however, are the fails they had to go through to perfect their recipes – unless, of course, if you’re in the Masak Apa Tak Jadi Hari Ni (Official) Facebook group. The group, which was started by Norlaila Dollah Ahmed, was initially started to document her own fails – but quickly became a source of entertainment for Malaysians during the quarantine. After being name-dropped by our Prime Minister on TV,  it now has over 1.6 million followers and plenty of hilarious content.  Just check out some of the postings:

Apparently ice cream

Playing with food, literally

A fat pretzel

Common sense is not common.. or maybe she just wanted them fresh

“Churros”

 

I can’t claim to be a very good cook, and I’m fairly certain that if I were to try some Internet recipes, the dishes would come out looking worse than some of those posted lmao. But I think it’s good to not take ourselves so seriously sometimes. Hope you’ve been entertained! For more posts, look up Masak Apa Tak Jadi Hari Ni on FB. 😉

 

 

 

 

What’s On My Playlist Vol. 5 : Quarantine Edition

Hey guys!

It’s currently day 36 of the movement control order here in Malaysia. To be honest, I’ve been way more productive with work than I was at the office. Some people find it difficult to work from home due to distractions or family commitments (parents with kids, for example – I can imagine how difficult it is to video call your boss while you’re trying to calm a screaming toddler). Thankfully, I don’t have that problem, so the only issue is discipline.

To make sure I don’t roll around on the bed when I’m really supposed to be working (my workspace is in my bedroom, I’ve set a schedule which I follow strictly: work from 9 to 5 on weekdays, and unplug on weekends. And because I don’t have to be stuck in traffic for three hours everyday, there’s much more time to relax and unwind – which in turn keeps me refreshed and more productive overall.

The other good thing is that I’ve had plenty of time to catch up on books, movies and music. One of my favourite websites for entertainment is openculture: you can find everything from virtual tours of famous museums and art galleries, to book readings, podcasts, language lessons, and of course, music.

My Analog Journal is a Youtube channel dedicated to exploring rare grooves around the world on vinyl. The music selection is eclectic, and covers everything from Brazilian grooves and Japanese jazz from the 70s, to UK 80s and 90s Soundsystem and even Turkish Anatolian Rock. Rather than put up a generic album cover or illustration, you get a video of the channel’s founder, London-based music producer, DJ and filmmaker Zag Erlat (aka Zagor), playing the records on his setup. Born and raised in Istanbul, Turkey, Zagor’s love for analog film can be seen in the sepia-toned aesthetics of his videos, which give off a chill retro/vintage vibe. Perfect with a mug of coffee and a nice book.

I stumbled across Skinshape while listening to music on Youtube (thanks, Youtube recommendations!). A project by British musician William Dorey, the music is inspired by many genres but in particular 1960s – 70s funk, soul, reggae, psych, folk and African music.

Been a fan of Khruangbin‘s music for a long time now. (Khruangbin is Thai for ‘flying thing’, or aeroplane). This Texas trio is a true testament to the saying that ‘music is universal’ – their first album, The Universe Smiles Upon You, draws inspiration from the psychedelic sound of Thai surfrock from the 1960s, while 2018’s Con Todo El Mundo has influences from Spain (a tribute to the lead singer’s Spanish roots) and the Middle East.

British musician Hope Tala‘s music is characterised by its mix of R&B and bossa nova, to produce a uniquely chill yet groovy beat. She writes and produces her own music, and has a mature, soulful voice that is way beyond her 22 years.

Remember when he was ‘Pink Guy’? How far you’ve come, Joji.

 

What’s on your playlist? Share them with me in the comments so I can check them out! 🙂

 

Covid-19 : The Battle for Malaysia

Hey, guys! This is going to be a long post.

We’re coming to the end of the first quarter of 2020. To say that it has been a shitty year so far (for humanity as a whole) is an understatement, with thousands dying around the world, healthcare services overwhelmed, businesses shuttering and people getting laid off (I talked to a friend in Seattle a couple of days ago who told me he had just been let go from his job as a chef). It is extremely sad to read about how families in Italy have had to bury their loved ones without the chance to even say goodbye.

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On the bright side, the earth seems to be healing quite nicely without all the pollution and damage humans inflict on the environment. Although, NatGeo has debunked several viral posts about animals returning to empty cities (like swans swimming in the canals of Venice, as well as elephants in Thailand getting drunk on corn wine) – I understand that sometimes it’s nice to have a ‘feel good’ story to uplift one’s spirits, but spreading false news makes it more difficult to sift through the real ones, and can actually do more harm than good.

Tomorrow (April 1) marks stage 2 of the Restricted Movement Order here in Malaysia, which will run until April 14. The order was initially set to end on March 31, but we all know an extension was inevitable, as two weeks wouldn’t have done much anyway.

Malaysians in general are quite a laid back bunch. I don’t know if it’s a pro or con (perhaps a con in this climate where decisive and swift action should be taken). So for the first week or so, the government kept urging the public to stay at home, and for participants of the tabligh (the prayer session which was attended by thousands at the end of February – which is linked to most of the cases in Malaysia) to come forward voluntarily for testing. Of course, after pleading for two weeks, they’ve finally decided that the time for talk is now over, and have started arresting people who flout the order. Compliance is at 95%, but there is still 5% (which means a whopping 1.5 million) of the population that is not complying. I was out for a grocery run earlier (I’ve only gone out twice so far, both times for perishable goods because those can’t be kept long) and although many shops are closed, I still see quite a lot of traffic on the road.

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For those who follow Malaysian politics, you might be aware of the political shenanigans that went down just before the COVID-19 blew up here. Literal GoT. Long story short, there was a power struggle between different political parties, switched alliances –  and the party that was voted democratically by the people lost their majority due to ‘frogs’ leaping to form other parties.

All eyes are on current Prime Minister Muhiyiddin, to see what this leader whom we did not elect will do in times of crisis. While I’m not an economic expert, nor do I understand the intricacies of how an economy works, I don’t begrudge that there have been policies in place to help households, which are, all things considered, quite generous. (Where they’re going to get that money I don’t know, since they’re always talking about how empty our coffers are. Borrowing? More debt?)

The Malaysian population is divided into three sections based on income – Bottom 40 (B40), Middle 40 (M40) and Top 20 (T20). The most vulnerable group in times of crisis is, of course, the B40. I’ve detailed in a previous post how difficult it is to survive on RM2,000 if you’re staying in KL where the cost of living is high (the official national poverty line is RM980), and with some places offering barely the minimum wage (I once saw an ad hiring waiters in Puchong for just over RM1k wtf), those who fall into this category are now most vulnerable. With businesses shuttered, they are not able to work. What more those who survive on a daily wage (hawkers, etc.)

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The government’s move to help this group out is to offer financial aid in the form of cash hand outs, to help them tide over this period.

  • Singles earning RM2,000 and below – RM800 cash aid. (RM500 in April, RM300 in May). Includes single senior citizens.
  • Families with joint income below RM4,000 – RM1,600 cash aid. (RM1,000 in April, RM600 in May).

We have a large middle-class population, and SMEs are a huge part of the economy. N once said he was surprised to find the number of bustling mid-tier businesses in Malaysia, which is apparently not as common in the Philippines, where he is from. The M40 is the larger driver of the economy, so there are also initiatives to help them out:

  • Singles earning between RM2,000 and RM4,000 – RM500 cash aid (RM250 in April, Rm250 in May)
  • Families with joint income between RM4,000 – RM8,000 – RM 1,000 cash aid (RM500 in April, RM500 in May)
  • Deferment of loans from banks for six months, although interest rates still apply

To help SMEs and businesses, as well as try to prevent lay-offs, the government is also providing a subsidised wage of RM600 for three months for employees earning less than RM4,000 and employers who have experienced a 50% decrease in income since January 2020. However, this is provided they do not dismiss the employees or force them to take unpaid leave for three months. They are also not allowed to deduct an employee’s existing pay.

All in all, the government has announced a whopping RM250 billion economic stimulus package – some of which will be channeled into the aforementioned handouts, others in other sectors. I can’t fault it because it is quite a generous plan, but how it will be in the long run, nobody knows.

The biggest problem is perhaps reaching out to everyone – obviously some groups will fall through the cracks. Rather than relying on the government, some private corporations and companies have stepped in to fill the gaps. Lazada Malaysia, for example, has stepped in to do deliveries for fresh vegetables from Cameron Highlands (our main source of veggies), because the RMO meant problems with logistics and tonnes of veggies were just left to rot. There are also 3-D printing companies stepping up to create PPE equipment for front liners at hospitals, as well as various NGOs coming together to distribute food to the vulnerable such as the poor in PPR flats and the homeless. If you are not able to volunteer outside, here’s a list of verified NGOs that you can contribute to here. 

Screen Shot 2020-03-31 at 2.36.06 PM

Image from NST.

I must also commend our Director General of Health, Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah. Datuk Dr Noor Hisham has proven to be a swift, decisive and effective leader who thinks ahead. He has been the face of the fight against COVID 19 since it started, and his calm and efficient manner has earned him praise among the public. He has already put into action plans such as converting the Serdang Expo Park into a temporary hospital, in case beds at hospitals nationwide run out.

COVID cases in Malaysia are expected to peak in mid-April, but even then, the good doctor has already said that this is something that requires cooperation by all – not just the government, but the people. In the meantime, for those of us who are privileged enough to just stay at home/work from home without worrying for the next couple of weeks, please. Be patient, and help by staying at home. Where you can, support local businesses, like ordering delivery from your local hawker stall if they offer it. There are people out there who are struggling to feed themselves. It’s difficult for everyone, but as the saying goes in Malay, berat mata memandang, berat lagi bahu memikul.

Stay safe and healthy, peeps!

Cravings

Hey guys!

I was literally in the middle of writing a post about all the food I’d eat once this whole quarantine thing is over when our Prime Minister announced that the Movement Control Order would be extended by another 2 weeks… to 14 April. While I understand that it’s necessary, I also understand that I am speaking from a place of privilege in that I do not have to worry about the immediate problem of feeding myself and my family members. There are many others out there who are not as lucky, and the government cannot take care of everyone. It is at this time that we should do our part as responsible citizens – spare whatever donations we can to front liners, look out for our neighbours (especially if you have elderly or disabled neighbours – even something as simple as buying their groceries for them), and most importantly, help by staying at home. The sooner this thing goes away, the sooner we can get back to some normalcy.

The impact of the coronavirus is massive, and may reverberate for years to come. I have several friends who have already been laid off because their companies cannot afford to keep them. I still have my job but with the travel industry bleeding (haemorrhaging, more like), I might join the ranks of unemployment very soon.

It’s hard not to get sucked into worry and negativity. But I also feel it’s important to keep up hope, so I’m going ahead with this post – I’ll still be looking forward to eating these things once this is all over.  When this is all over.

PS: If you’re wondering why they’re mostly high-calorie food, it’s because my mom hasn’t been allowing us to eat anything fried or unhealthy because she’s worried we might fall sick. She also hasn’t allowed us to call Grabfood or anything for fear of contamination. There is literally no junk food in the house other than instant noodles, which is reserved for emergencies only. My lunch and dinners have mostly been rice with steamed/boiled _____, and vegetables. I think she can be a stricter trainer than Jillian Michaels. THE CRAVING IS REAL 

 

MOZZARELLA CHEESE STICKS @ BOOKMARK COFFEE PJ 

https://www.instagram.com/p/B94H6Y6JyH1/

This was actually a recent discovery. It’s such a pity I only managed to eat it once before the MCO took place. I first visited Bookmark Coffee PJ after one of our contributors at the magazine suggested it (review here) for their really cute latte art. The coffee is good, but the food items that I’ve tried are also great – especially their smoked duck rice which comes in generous portions. The mozzarella cheese sticks they serve are perfectly fried to order, with a crunchy golden exterior and gooey insides.

SHIMEJI KARAAGE @ SUSHI ZANMAI 

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I have pretty weird eating habits in that when I find something that I like at a shop, I literally order the same thing every time. Whenever I go to the Sushi Zanmai near my office, the order is always the same – white rice, shimeji karaage, and chuka idaako (marinated baby octopus). I order it so often that the waiter recognises me and will literally ask me if it’s the usual, lol. But there’s just something addictive about these lightly battered and seasoned fried shrooms – and it pairs so well with rice!

NASI LEMAK

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Come on guys. You can’t call yourself a Malaysian and not crave this. There might be different ways of preparing it, but ultimately, you gotta have that fluffy Santan (coconut milk) infused rice, paired with crunchy peanuts, anchovies, spicy sambal and fried chicken. My favourite is actually the one from Jalan Peel, Cheras,  sold by a Chinese auntie who has put her own spin onto this traditional Malay food. Her crunchy and flavourful fried chicken literally flies off the rack as soon as they’re out of the wok, and the cuttlefish sambal is to die for. Review here. 

NASI SOTONG KUNYIT 

The presentation may be a bit messy, but nothing beats a hearty, economical packet of nasi sotong kunyit. I often have this from a food truck near my workplace, and it’s very popular with office workers. It also comes in either chicken or beef. The meat is marinated in a mixture of spices including kunyit (turmeric – hence the name) and chilli, then fried together with green beans, onions and carrots.The sambal gives it a spicy kick.

FRIED CHICKEN 

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In my ideal world, we’d all be able to feast on fried chicken without fear of health repercussions and getting fat – because I can literally eat fried chicken every day. My favourite fried chicken is the spicy one from A&W – the meat is usually fresh, the skin has the perfect crisp, it is not greasy and the meat is tender and juicy. Of course, I wouldn’t say no to some Korean fried chicken wings and drummettes either! 🙂

DIM SUM @ YUAN LE DIM SUM PUCHONG 

Having a dimsum brunch on weekend mornings is almost a ritual for me. For the uninitiated, dim sum literally means ‘touch the heart’ – and with its vast variety of steamed, baked and fried goodies,  it certainly does. I’ve been eating at Yuan Le in Puchong for a long time, even though the customer service is terrible – there’s a familiar taste to the food that I can’t find anywhere else. It’s also a place I go often with friends and family, so there are good memories associated with the ritual of breakfast and enjoying tea. I usually order the shrimp dumplings, shrimp rolls and shrimp chee cheong fun (rice rolls).

RAMEN @ MENYA SHI SHI DO 

Japanese restaurants are a dime a dozen in KL – but good ones are harder to find. One of these places is Menya Shi Shi Do @ Jaya One in PJ, which was opened by a Japanese chef married to a local woman. The place was always packed even before it became famous on TV (after which I stopped visiting because the line was always like an hour long), but I think I’ll pay a visit after this quarantine. The broth is packed with flavour and the noodles have an al dente, springy texture with plenty of bite.

 

Writing this has actually made me extremely hungry lol.

What are some of the foods you crave that you can’t wait to go for once the quarantine is over?

 

 

 

My Mini Library

Hey guys!

It’s Day 6 of the Restricted Movement Order in Malaysia. Officially, there are 8 more days to go –  but looking at the upward trend of cases, an extension might be imminent. 😦 I know I am luckier than most in that I have enough savings to tide me over should the RMO be prolonged, but there are many out there such as the homeless and the destitute who are in danger of falling through the cracks as governments scramble to control the spread of the virus. Aside from doing our part as good citizens, we should also help donate what we can to help frontliners such as charity workers and NGOs.

As for what I’ve been doing at home: I’ve been working on my articles, both for my main job as well as my side hustles. It’s a good thing I did them way ahead of time, because looking at how things are, it’ll be a while before I can go out to conduct any sort of interview.

It can be difficult to keep yourself disciplined when you’re ‘working’ from home (my workspace is literally two steps away from my bed) but so far I’ve been adhering to my routine – wakeup at around 8.30 am to 9, breakfast, and then start working by 10. I take a short break for lunch, and then I work until 5pm and wrap up for the day. In the evenings I either help my mom out in the kitchen, or I work out for half an hour. After dinner, I surf the net, read or write for the blog.

The good thing about not having to spend time in traffic is that I have more time to do the things I want. I recently sorted out some photos in my laptop and realised I never blogged about my book cabinet. I had it installed at the end of last year because my mom, a neat freak, was losing it over how many books I had (and kept buying). I had books all over the place; on a bookshelf in my room, in the cabinet downstairs, in giant containers and boxes. She gave me an ultimatum – either I got a bigger space to keep everything, or she’d throw them away. So, cabinet it was.

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It took a couple of days to set up (problem with parts and stuff) but the result was great. It’s harder to get to the books at the top though, so we put stuff we don’t normally take out often like the photo albums and some old magazines.

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N was still here last year (he’s now in the Phils due to job commitments) so he had no choice but to help me sort out my mountain of books lol. You gotta work for your board and lodging, bruh

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It took us several hours but we finally got everything nicely in place! Even had them sorted out according to category, so there’s like a section for all the comics, Asian literature, fantasy, historical fiction and horror. How do you sort your books? I know some people like to sort their books according to colour, or alphabetical order, or genre.

 

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My favourite shelf.

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If you see books that look like they’re in a less-than-stellar condition, they’re either a) second-hand books, or b) my favourites, because I like to reread books and they somehow end up in tatters lol.

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Asian literature.

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Another shelf in my room. The books ended up in the upper cabinets.

People have asked me if I’ve actually read ALL of the books I have. And no, I haven’t. My reading habits have gone down the drain ever since I started working, but I’ve been trying to get back into it these last couple of months, and I can proudly say I’ve finished at least one book a month in the last 3 months. Now, only several dozen to go…