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Nyonya.love, Bandar Kinrara Puchong

If there’s one cuisine I think best represents Malaysia’s storied history of immigration and assimilation, it’s Peranakan, or Nyonya, cuisine. The Peranakans (also called Straits Chinese) are descendants of early Chinese migrants who settled mostly in Malacca and Penang in Malaysia, parts of Indonesia, as well as Singapore in the late 18th to early 19th centuries. Many Peranakans intermarried with locals, adopting Malay customs as their own. As such, Nyonya cuisine is an interesting blend of Chinese influences and cooking techniques, paired with Malay ingredients and spices.

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For those craving authentic Melaka-style Peranakan food, Nyonya.love at Bandar Kinrara dishes out popular favourites the likes of Ayam Pongteh, Nyonya Curry Laksa, Nasi Lemak, kueh, and more – served in a cozy and intimate setting that’s perfect for get togethers or casual hangouts. The fam and I were here for my aunt and uncle’s 50th anniversary wedding, and we got to try a wide variety of their specialities.

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The restaurant’s interior is spacious, with tables adequately spaced to adhere to social distancing rules. The grey concrete walls and floors boast an ‘unfinished’ look which is the in thing these days, but it lends the space an air of elegance. The counter also features interestingly-shaped concrete nooks made to look like traditional Peranakan tiles. The industrial look is spruced up by cozy wood accents and lots of plants, while cute decorations – such as the colourful tiffin carriers at the counter – add character.

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The aunts had ordered two platters of traditional Nyonya kueh for sharing. The vibrant colours of these assorted bite-sized snacks were as much a feast for the eyes as they were for the stomach. My favourites are the angku (‘tortoise cakes’ – glutinous rice snacks filled with mung bean paste) and kuih kosui (steamed rice cake made from tapioca flour and rice flour), as they have a chewy texture.

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Once all the fam members had arrived, our meals were served. I had the Nyonya Curry Laksa, which came in a humongous portion. In hindsight, I should have shared this with someone else because although it was tasty, I struggled to finish the noodles. The curry is notably different from regular curry laksa – as you can tell, the curry was lighter in colour, creamy but not cloying, and I could taste the distinct blend of spices such as turmeric, lemongrass, onions, and shallots. The bowl also came with generous servings of fish balls, tofu pok, shrimp, and a dollop of sambal for that extra kick.

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The Hubs and Pops both had Nasi Lemak Rendang Ayam. The coconut milk rice was tasty, but the star of the dish for me was the chicken rendang. The meat was fall-off-the-bone tender, and the rendang was rich and creamy.

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Our mains alone were enough, but then the aunts also ordered some pai tee. These crispy snacks are shaped like top hats, with the crunchy shells holding braised jicama within. The contrast of textures makes it super addictive to munch on!

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The Bro’s Curry Chicken with Roti Jala. Compared to the rendang, which has a thicker texture, the curry is more soupy and is more savoury.

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Nyonya acar traces its roots to India, where the dish is known as achar (or literally, pickles). Pickling vegetables has long been a practice in ancient India, and with the spread of Indian culture via powerful Hindu-Buddhist kingdoms, the cuisine spread to Maritime Southeast Asia.

The version at Nyonya.love is very refreshing – there’s sliced cucumber, carrots, pineapple, and cabbage (?) in a sweet, sour, and savoury sauce, topped with sesame seeds. I think it’s perfect as an appetizer, as it really whets the appetite.

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Rounding off the meal, we shared a bowl of cendol. Sweet, cold, and refreshing – what more could one ask for?

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The restaurant also allowed us to cut the cakes we bought from Torte by Linda, which is located within the same building. Try their medovik (Russian Honey Cake) – it’s too die for!

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Happy 50th Wedding Anniversary!

Aside from awesome Peranakan food, we were grateful for how accommodating the Nyonya.love team was as well in making our occasion a memorable one. 🙂 Definitely a recommend spot for when the craving for Peranakan cuisine kicks in!

NYONYA.LOVE

B-LG-5, Eight, Jalan BK 5a/3, Bandar Kinrara, 47180 Puchong, Selangor

Open: Tues – Sun (11.30AM – 7.30PM)

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Ha Ha Siu Pan Mee, Bandar Puchong Jaya

Ha Ha Siu Pan Mee was once my regular place for pan mee in Puchong, my favourite order being their century egg dumpling pan mee. Not many places serve dumplings stuffed with century egg and pork, and the version here pairs well with hand shredded wheat noodles, served in a clear and flavourful soup.

Unfortunately, I had a bad bout with food poisoning several years ago after eating said dish, and I have since ceased going to the place.

That was six years ago, lol.

The Moo was recently craving pan mee, and I thought hey, six years is a pretty long time to hold a food grudge — maybe it’s time to give them another chance. But while I did not get chills, vomiting, and diarrhea this time around — the food quality and service definitely isn’t like what it was before.

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Parking is a bitch in Bandar Puchong Jaya. If you’re here during peak hours, I suggest just paying for the private parking across the street from where the resto is, rather than driving around hoping for a miracle spot.

The restaurant’s interior has not changed much. The lights are dim and cast a yellow glow, but not in a cozy kind of way, so it makes the space look dated. We were here on a weekend, but there wasn’t much of a crowd. It still took awhile for our orders to be served.

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Moo ordered Chinese dessert (I think it was foo chok yee mai), but did not like it because as you can see, the consistency was very starchy.

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One thing Ha Ha Siu Pan Mee has is variety. Aside from the regular soup pan mee (above), they also offer different varieties such as the century egg dumpling pan mee (yes, it’s still on the menu, lol), curry pan mee, ma lat (spicy), and Sabah style which comes with fried pork. You can also choose the thickness and style of your noodle (thin, thick, cut, hand shredded), as well as special flavours (pumpkin, spinach, coriander, beetroot).

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The Pops, N, and I ordered the Chilli Pan Mee. I prefer my noodles thick cut, as they usually give a better bite. The noodles here were cooked a tad too long though so they were softer than I liked. They provide a decent amount of chilli in the bowl, but if you like spicy food, you can always add more from the container which is available at each table. Funny thing : they don’t provide soup with your dry noodles, unless you request for it.

Was it a bad bowl of noodles by any stretch? No. It was just.. okay. Decent. I definitely remember the quality being much better all those years ago, but I guess all good things come to an end?

If you’d like awesome pan mee, I recommend this.

HAHA SIU PAN MEE

7, Jalan Kenari 19a, Bandar Puchong Jaya, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 9.30AM – 8.30PM

PS: I am not paid to review this in any form, shape, or way. Views here are entirely my own.

PS2: I hope you liked this post! Please consider supporting my blog via Patreon, so I can make more. Or buy me a cup of coffee on Paypal @erisgoesto

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Roast Meats @ Chan Meng Kee, Bandar Puteri Puchong

The Chan Meng Kee brand, famed for its roasted meats, was started in 2008 by Chan Yoke Pui, a self-professed ‘charsiew fanatic’. The original restaurant in SS2, Petaling Jaya, quickly gained a loyal following, as patrons thronged the store for their dose of siew yuk (crispy roast pork), char siew (sweet barbecued pork), and roast chicken, served with their signature noodles or rice.

Today, Chan Meng Kee has two other branches – one in Da Men Mall USJ, and another in Puchong, the latter of which I visited for lunch with the fam. The store is simple but comfortable, with basic tables and chairs, floor to ceiling windows that afford plenty of natural sunlight, and air conditioning. Diners can also see the chefs chopping up the meats through a glass window next to the kitchen.

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Our food did not take long to arrive. The Hubs ordered the siew yuk, which came in generous portions atop a bed of cucumbers. The rice was also topped with two slices of sweet liver sausage. The pork was well seasoned, with crunchy, crackly skin, and a nice balance between the lean and fat. The liver sausage was superb – basted in a sweet, caramel-like sauce, the sausage casing was chewy on the outside, with bits of fat within the sausage that lent it a unique texture. It was so good I ordered a separate plate!

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Liver sausage is a rarer menu item compared to the usual trio of roasties – chicken, siew yuk, and char siew.
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Chan Meng Kee does roast duck as well. I like that they gave me the thigh part; there was a lot of meat, and it was easy to eat. The blend of textures and flavours – crispy skin, the melt-in-your-mouth layer of fat underneath it, the slightly gamey duck meat seasoned with herbs and spices – came together perfectly. While I still prefer the roast duck from Soon Lok, Chan Meng Kee can probably give it a run for its money.

Aside from roast items, the restaurant also offers dishes such as poached chicken, curry laksa, shrimp wontons, and more. Prices are reasonable for the setting, ranging around RM10-RM15 for single plates.

CHAN MENG KEE (PUCHONG)

No.1-GF, Jalan Puteri 1/4, Bandar Puteri, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 9AM – 3.30PM, 5PM – 8.30PM (closed Wednesdays)

PS: I hope you liked this post! Please consider supporting my blog via Patreon, so I can make more. Or buy me a cup of coffee on Paypal @erisgoesto

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Meal for Two: S’mores, Bangsar South

The Moomin’s eye doctor is located at Nexus Bangsar South, so I’ve been hanging around the neighbourhood a lot lately (her eye is much better now, but we’ve been doing follow-ups regularly because it wasn’t healing as quickly as it should due to age).

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On one of these follow-ups, we checked into S’mores for lunch. The place has been around since Nexus opened and touts itself as a “friendly neighbourhood bistro that promises the coldest beers” and “the most authentic charcoal and wood fire cooked western delights”. It was a weekday and the restaurant was packed with office workers, but service was still fast, attentive and friendly. The resto has a nice, chill vibe, a large bar and an al-fresco dining area.

The menu is mostly Western (think pastas, pizzas, ribs and burgers), with some Asian favourites thrown in (nasi lemak, laksa, meehoon). The Moomins and I ordered set lunches (RM16.90++) which came with a drink.

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Smores looks like a great place for a beer or two with colleagues after work
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The Moomin’s Spaghetti Bolognese. Portions were very generous.
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My carbonara spaghetti came in a huge serving, topped with heaps of Parmesan cheese. The pasta was cooked al dente, and it was creamy without being cloying (to me, at least), with generous bits of bacon. Solid dish, no complaints. Those who don’t like rich flavours might want to give it a pass though.

S’MORES

Nexus, Bangsar South, Unit G7, Ground Floor, Jalan Kerinchi, 59200 Kuala Lumpur

Opening hours: 11AM – 12AM (daily)

smores.com.my

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Thong Kee Kopitiam, Puchong – One of Puchong’s Best Breakfast Spots

A classic Malaysian breakfast typically consists of toast with kaya and butter plus half boiled eggs, washed down with a nice cup of coffee or tea. You will find this and more at Thong Kee Kopitiam in Puchong. The shop also ups the ante with something you’d normally see in bakeries rather than kopitiams: croissants.

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Originally from Pahang, Thong Kee started off as a humble establishment in the small town of Bentong. Like many kopitiams, the fare served here has Hainanese origins (The Hainanese people emigrated to Malaya during the British occupation. Most worked as cooks for the British; hence the ‘Western’ style of breakfast ie toast with butter and jam + coffee that is often served at kopitiams today. It is a uniquely Southeast Asian thing which you will not find in the Hainanese community in China.) Eventually, the brand grew popular enough that they expanded to the Klang Valley, with an outlet in Seapark and another in Puchong.

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The early bird gets the worm, or in this case… the croissant.

All of their outlets enjoy brisk business, so it’s best to come as early as possible if you want avoid the queues. The fam and I came around 7.45AM on a weekend and the place was already quite packed. There is a huge open-air kitchen with dozens of staff preparing drinks and food.

Take note of your table number, give it to the cashier when you make your order, pay on the spot, and wait for your food to be served. Aside from toast with butter and kaya, you can also go for items like doughnuts, and croissants with various fillings (ham, ham and cheese, egg, otak-otak, etc.)

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The original Thong Kee is famous for its 1+1 – a blend of Hainanese coffee and tea – so I ordered a glass to try.

The drink comes served with a layer of foam on top, and the coffee is strong and fragrant. It is similar to Ipoh white coffee; ie sweet and aromatic. I think the tea helps to make the beverage smoother, but the coffee is pretty strong so I barely tasted any tea.

Trivia: Unlike Western coffee, making Hainanese coffee usually involves roasting the beans with salt, sugar and margarine, imparting it with a rich, robust fragrance with a distinctly caramelized flavour. The coffee is then filtered through a long sock-like cloth multiple times.

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Not forgetting the star of the show, we ordered a few croissants to share. The texture is superb – crispy, flaky, buttery and soft on the inside. The fillings are deceptively simple – ham and egg, or a slab of butter and kaya spread – but everything comes together perfectly.

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If you’re not in the mood for bread, there are other stalls at the kopitiam as well, selling dishes like nasi lemak and pan mee.

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If you’re looking for a quick bite to go, or something you can bring home, the shop also sells freshly baked loaves, homemade kaya and curry puffs.

The croissants are priced around RM7.90 +, depending on filling.

THONG KEE (PUCHONG)

G-01 Puchong Square, Jalan Layang – Layang 5, Bandar Puchong Jaya, 47170 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 7.30AM – 4.30PM

thongkee.com.my

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Spices – Indian Claypot Rice (Sattisoru) @ Restoran Try To Eat, Rawang

Claypots have been used in traditional cooking for centuries and across many different cultures. It is said that the porous quality of clay helps to retain the food’s nutritional value, whilst also giving the dish an earthy aroma and deeper flavours.

Here in Malaysia, claypot chicken rice is very popular among the Chinese diaspora. It usually contains chopped pieces of chicken, salted fish, chives and Chinese sausage, drizzled over with dark soy sauce. The dish was traditionally eaten in Southern China as a dinner dish, and it was later brought over to Southeast Asia (Malaysia/Singapore) by Hokkien immigrants.

Indian-style claypot rice (sattisoru), however, is new to me. Perhaps it’s because I don’t eat Indian food often (blame it on my canto palate!), but I’ve been ignorant about its existence until recently, when I had to interview and write about a street chef in Rawang who sells sattisoru.

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You can find Spices Claypot Rice tucked within Restoran Try to Eat, a no-frills food court by the side of the road. Despite being the only Indian stall here, it attracts customers of all races. There’s a wide variety of dishes on offer, including their signature Claypot Mutton Masala (RM12), Chicken Masala, Prawn Masala and Chilli Chicken Masala. Less common ingredients like salted fish and sardine are also available, and there are vegetarian options for non-meat eaters.

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Spices is run by Janagaraju Arumugam, a young chef with a huge passion for food. Prior to opening Spices two years ago together with his wife, Jana worked as an engineer and had no F&B experience – so it was a big leap of faith.

“We started this as a part-time venture. My wife was a pharmacist and I was still working as an engineer. We’d only open our stall after we finished our day jobs, at 6pm,” he quips. Juggling two jobs was exhausting, but Jana keenly pushed forward. Eventually, he quit his job to run the stall full-time, and has since hired more people to help out at his stalls, of which there are four in the Klang Valley (aside from Rawang, he also has branches in Kota Kemuning, Selayang and Klang).

Why give up a cushy shop to be a chef-cum-businessman? Jana explains that as a boy, he used to help his mother out in the kitchen, and he recalls fondly how his mother’s love for her family shone through the dishes she made – something he is keen on preserving ever since she passed away. The dishes he serves at Spices are all based on recipes and techniques that were handed down by his late mother – and it truly shows in his cooking.

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Food photographer behind-the-scenes. It’s not easy taking shots especially when the chef is moving around – we had to retake some shots several times. Thank you Jana for your patience!

Cooking the claypot rice is an art in itself. Each order starts with a base of onion, potatoes, dried chili and masala paste, which is constantly stirred in the clay pot to bring out a mouthwatering aroma. Rice is
added last, after the liquid has simmered down, so it does not become soggy. Controlling the fire is also important, and because they are cooking it with a slow fire, it allows for a more even cooking process and the natural flavours of the ingredients to permeate through. Since everything is cooked to order, expect a wait of between 15 to 20 minutes.

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I tried two clay pot dishes – the mutton masala and the prawn masala. Between the two, I enjoyed the mutton masala more as the meat was tender and flavourful, having absorbed the flavours of the curry. The heat wasn’t obvious at first bite, but hits gradually and had me chugging down my sugarcane juice lol. Portions are hearty and can be shared between two people. You also get a whole boiled egg in each pot.

The masala paste is what makes the dish, as it contains over 20 spices such as cinnamon, pepper, coriander, cumin seeds and mace. The paste is ground in a central kitchen and distributed to the different stalls, so customers get a consistent quality and taste. It’s also free from additives, making it a healthier alternative to commercial mixes.

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More BTS. Photogs have it rough; they’re often the last to sit down (even after the journalist is done with the interview) because they have to take that perfect shot.

As for future plans, Jana is hoping to open five more stalls across Peninsular Malaysia, as well as a proper restaurant. All the best, Jana! Keep the passion alive. 🙂

SPICES CLAYPOT RICE

Restoran Try to Eat, 48, Jalan 1D, Taman Jati, 48000 Rawang, Selangor
Opening hours: 11AM – 11PM (daily)

facebook.com/spicesclaypotrice

Note: I interviewed Jana for the November issue of Fireflyz, the inflight magazine for Firefly Airlines. This article features a few tweaks and some additional info I wasn’t able to fit in to the story.

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If you enjoyed reading this, please consider supporting my website. Contrary to popular belief, I do not make big moolah from writing – and this will go towards hosting fees and ensuring that I can continue to deliver authentic content for your reading pleasure. Thanks for stopping by!

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Quarantine Meals ! – Of Dimsum, Nasi Lemak and Char Kuey Teow

Hey guys! It’s technically Day 51 of the Movement Control Order here in Malaysia. I will be resuming work at the office tomorrow. After nearly 2 months, it’s time to say hello again to traffic jams. :/

Originally, the MCO was supposed to be lifted on May 12 – but the government has already allowed businesses to reopen from May 4. It’s all very confusing: on one hand, the MCO is still in place, but everyone is already allowed out to work anyway so what’s the point of having the MCO? Personally, I feel that the move is too sudden (it was announced on May 1, giving businesses just 2 days to prepare). There’s also been a lot of political bullshit going on. Imho, I think the government is pressured to reopen businesses because the coffers are running out of money and they can’t afford to have the economy collapse. We’re also seeing lots of U-turns in terms of promised aid. Can’t help but think it’s every person for themselves now.

But enough doom and gloom: here’s a #foodpost! Being at home for close to two months has been great for my eating habits because I’m eating out less and having more homecooked food. I am an okay (?) cook, but if it were up to me, we’d be eating pasta, fried chicken, steaks and wraps every day – so it’s my mom that does most of the cooking. Most days it’s simple stuff like boiled vegetables and something like chicken and potatoes, or dishes that are steamed, stewed or stir-fried (deep fried is almost a taboo in my household because it’s ‘unhealthy’). Some days, though, we get better than average ones:

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Roasted chicken wings glazed with honey. 

We have a tiny, portable oven which does the job for roasting and baking. It’s adequate, but not very convenient. Prepping the chicken is easy – you just have to turn it over halfway through to make sure that it’s cooked thoroughly, and keep applying the glaze so that it’s nice and glistening.

I miss the oven I had back in Sheffield when I was a student. My housemates and I had a large oven in our flat, and it was so easy to pop everything in there – fish and chips, sausages, chipolatas, bacon. Much easier to clean up as well.

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Baked chicken and mushroom pies. They didn’t look perfect (the tops were sunken) but they tasted great. The mini ones were adorable, although they were not created intentionally lol (Mom ran out of containers).

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Pork chops with white sauce. I fried the chops while Mom made the sauce with evaporated milk and a bit of flour. It turned out a bit too gooey, but the chops were moist, juicy and succulent so it wasn’t too bad.

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We don’t cook all the time – sometimes we also order takeout.

I am a big fan of dim sum, and I usually have it at least once a month pre-coronavirus days – but none of my usual dim sum haunts was open in the initial days of the quarantine. After 45 days, I finally broke my dim sum ‘fast’ with takeout from Jin Xuan Restaurant in Bandar Puteri Puchong. I don’t usually come here because it’s out of the way and their items are pricier than some other establishments, but at the time, I was just super glad to be able to get my dim sum fix lol. (Above, clockwise from bottom left – fried shrimp dumplings, shrimp rolls, siew mai (pork and shrimp dumplings), and har gaw (shrimp dumplings)).

JIN XUAN HONG KONG DIM SUM: 27, Jalan Puteri 1/6, Bandar Puteri, 47100 Puchong, Selangor (open for take-away only during the MCO) 

 

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Another time for lunch, we bought Nasi Lemak from Brilliant Nasi Lemak House, just a block away from Jin Xuan. The resto specialises in nasi lemak ie rice cooked in coconut milk and served with dishes such as fried chicken, rendang, curry and sambal sotong. Against my better judgment, I had the sambal sotong. It was good but the portions were rather small. If you like spicy food, the sambal here delivers a strong kick.

BRILLIANT NASI LEMAK HOUSE : 2, Jalan Puteri 1/2, Bandar Puteri, 47100 Kuala Lumpur, Selangor (open for takeaway only during the MCO) 

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Last but not least, the all-time Malaysian favourite, char kuey teow or wok-fried flat noodles. This one’s from a famous franchise called Goreng Kuey Teow Tong Shin. You can opt to get kuey teow mee (mix of flat noodles and yellow noodles, as pictured above), and add on items such as cockles, Chinese sausages and other ingredients. The basic char kuey teow will usually have shrimp, egg, kuchai, cockles and chilli sauce. What makes char kuey teow so divine is the smokiness that you can only get from wok frying it over a huge flame. Control of the fire is essential. The one from Tong Shin is pretty good !

GORENG KUEY TEOW TONG SHIN: G, 27, Jalan Puteri 2/6, Bandar Puteri Puchong, 47100 Puchong, Selangor (Open for takeaway only during the MCO). 

 

 

What are some of your quarantine meals? Are you cooking at home or ordering more takeout? Share them with me in the comments below; I’d love to hear about any delicious dishes you’ve had! 

 

The Best Fried Chicken From Fast Food Chains in Malaysia: Ranked

After over a month in isolation… I FINALLY. got. to. eat. Fried chicken. 

Ever since the start of the movement control order here in Malaysia due to the COVID pandemic, my diet has been nothing but healthy, homecooked meals that are either a) steamed, b) boiled or c) stir-fried. And bland, because less salt, less sugar, less oil, less everything. Of course, I’m not complaining – but a girl just misses her fried food sometimes. If this MCO continues, it’ll be good for my waistline; not so much my sanity.

After weeks of trying to convince my mother to let me order GrabFood (she has been insisting on cooking every meal because apparently e-hailing riders may carry the virus), she finally relented  – and I was able to place a sweet, sweet order for some Marrybrown fried chicken. My brother was laughing at the exaggerated way I opened my box, as if unveiling some treasure – but I told him it IS treasure. Golden, crispy fried treasure. 30 minutes later, I sat contentedly in the dining room chair, my eyes glazed over in a high of bliss; like a druggie who just got her fix, lmao.

If it isn’t’ already obvious… I love fried chicken. I love how simple it is to make, yet utterly delicious. I love how different cultures around the world all agree that fried chicken is a universal comfort food. Most of all, I love how good fried chicken tastes – the juiciness of the insides, the crisp flavourful exterior. Which is why I’m sharing with you my ranking of THE best fried chicken from fast food outlets in Malaysia. Note that this is my personal ranking – so you might disagree with me, which is totally fine: everyone has their own preferences.

1 ) A&W’s Golden Aroma Chicken / Spicy Golden Aroma Chicken 

One of my fondest childhood memories is of my 8th birthday party at the A&W in Taman Jaya. Back then (for an eight-year-old, at least) having a birthday party at a fast food joint was like throwing a grand banquet at the St Regis – and I gorged myself on coney dogs, curly fries, rootbeer float and waffles. Funnily enough, I can’t seem to recall eating fried chicken at A&W : I think it’s a relatively new item since I only have memories of trying it for the first time after joining the workforce.

I usually have A&W at the original outlet in Taman Jaya, or at IOI Mall in Puchong. The chicken is always super fresh; sometimes it takes time for your order to be served because they don’t fry a big batch in advance – but it’s worth the wait. The skin is perfectly breaded and fried to golden brown perfection, the insides are juicy, and the complex flavour of herbs permeates throughout the entire piece of chicken, not just on the skin. I think their spicy chicken is actually one of the hottest ones, in comparison to other fast-food chains.

2) Marrybrown 

Marrybrown is a homegrown fast-food chain that specialises in fried chicken, burgers and Asian fusion dishes, such as fried chicken with nasi lemak, rice, porridge and the like. While it may not be as popular as, say KFC and McDonalds, it is pretty well known throughout Malaysia especially in smaller towns, and has a strong presence in the Middle East.

For some reason, Malaysians are not big on gravy and sauces with their fried chicken, which is a big shame because gravy + fried chicken = killer combo (the reason why I love Jollibee). While Marrybrown chicken is good on its own, I like that they offer sauces to go with your meal. My favourite was the mushroom sauce, although this was later discontinued. They still have the black pepper sauce option though, which is very spicy and peppery – perfect for soaking up with the savoury, well-marinated chicken meat.

3) McDonalds Ayam Goreng McD 

I consider McDonalds to be an all-rounder when it comes to fast food – their burgers are good, but so are their other offerings, including the fried chicken. McD’s spicy fried chicken has a distinctive fiery orange colour and somewhat loose (?) breading. The meat has good flavour and is usually fresh. The popularity of the fried chicken soared after McDonalds Malaysia made this simple yet super effective ad which had no music, no narration – just the sound of people indulging in crunchy fried chicken.

4) KFC

You can’t mention fried chicken and not include KFC on the list. It’s a hit and miss in my books though – their quality control between outlets isn’t great. Case in point: the KFC near my house tastes pretty shitty (greasy, chicken isn’t fresh and has that been-in-the-freezer-too-long taste), but the one near my workplace makes excellent fried chicken. I prefer the original over the spicy.

5) Burger King

While they’re more popular for their burgers and whoppers, Burger King serves surprisingly good fried chicken, especially at their outlet at Sunway Pyramid. The chicken is crispy, breaded well and has moist, succulent meat.

6) Texas Chicken

Sorry, Texas fans. While the chicken is decent, it’s my least favourite as compared to the rest on this list because I’m not a big fan of the thick flour coating that Texas has, which also tastes pretty bland to me. Would eat it if I’m really craving fried chicken and there’s no other fast-food option around. I love their honey biscuit and sweet tea, though!

What are your favourite fast-food places to get fried chicken? Let me know if you agree with my ranking, or if you have a personal favourite!