Museum Of Illusions @ Ansa Hotel Bukit Bintang, Kuala Lumpur

At the Museum of Illusions, what you see is not always what you get.

Tucked within Ansa Hotel at the bustling Bukit Bintang area in Kuala Lumpur, this small but interesting family-friendly attraction is dedicated to all things illusion, priding itself in deceiving your senses.

I had tix from a media event so while the Boy and I were in town recently, we paid it a quick visit.

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The space itself is not very large, but there are dozens of tricks, puzzles and exhibits to keep visitors entertained for an hour or two. It’s a super educational place for both adults and children, and is sure to get the brain cogs turning!

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A Penrose triangle aka ‘impossible’ triangle – an optical illusion where the object appears to have no beginning or end point.

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Various optical illusions. People always say “You have to see to believe”, but a visit to the museum proves just how easy it is to trick our eyes and the brain.

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Believe it or not, the lines are all straight!

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There were several wooden block puzzles which visitors can try their hand at putting together. I didn’t manage even one but the Boy proved to have a higher IQ, successfully completing the above puzzle. Kudos! 

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A fun part of the museum were the ‘rooms’ which play with angles and perspectives to create optical illusions when photographed from a certain point. Using distance, we were able to capture a pic that looked as if the other person was many times bigger.

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Another room which was slanted. It was extremely difficult to keep my balance when walking inside – it was as if my brain was refusing to listen to my commands!

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Kaleidoscope mirror tunnel. No need for Insta filter here lol

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An ‘upside down’ house.

On second thought, should have directed the Boy to make a pose on the stairs that would make him seem like he’s coming down them backwards like Linda Blair in the Exorcist lolol

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We had fun solving puzzles on site, like the Tower of Hanoi, and stacking dices while making sure each side totaled up to 10.

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The museum also has a second floor, although it’s much smaller. Check out this colourful rotating tunnel! The Boy went through it like 5 – 6 times lol such an excited kid

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Had a great hour or so exploring the museum. It’s a bit pricey imo if you’re bringing the whole fam but if you have the budget, I think it’s a great family-friend place to visit. Definitely beats just walking around at a mall.

Entry is RM35 (adults – MYKAD) and RM25 (children). Foreigners pay RM10 extra for each category.

MUSEUM OF ILLUSIONS KL

Ansa Hotel 1st&2nd floor
101 Jalan Bukit Bintang
55100 Kuala Lumpur
Phone: 603-21102654

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Bonus pic: Taking a shot of our “Lego” selves at the Petronas Twin Towers !

 

Teddyville Museum @ DoubleTree By Hilton Penang, Malaysia

**Note: Photo heavy post! Video at bottom.

Here’s some good news for teddy bear fans: you don’t have to fly all the way to South Korea to visit their Teddy Bear Museum. We have one right here in Malaysia, and it’s pretty awesome!

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Tucked within DoubleTree Resort by Hilton Penang at Batu Feringghi is Teddyville Museum, a fun and interactive space that features the iconic, well loved toys that have been (and still are) a comforting companion to generations of children and adults for over a century. Covering 9,000 square feet, the museum is a good place to learn not only about teddy bear history, but also the story of Penang island.

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Don’t forget to pose with this giant teddy at the entrance! It stands (or sits) at a height twice as much as an average human, namely me. lol.

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The first section of the museum is dedicated to classic bears, some of which date back to the 1900s! The teddy bears of today have a pretty standard look, but classic teddies varied in material and appearance, and came in all shapes and sizes – like the one above which had very long strands of ‘fur’, next to two carved wooden ones.

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TEDDY TRIVIA

Have you ever wondered why they call it a ‘Teddy’ bear? The toys were named after US President Theodore ‘Teddy’ Roosevelt. The story goes that the president was on a bear hunting trip in Mississippi in 1902. Roosevelt’s assistants cornered and tied a black bear to a willow tree, and suggested he shoot it, but viewing this as unsportsmanlike, Roosevelt refused. News spread about the ‘big game hunter’ who refused to shoot a bear – and it was immortalised in a caricature published in the Washington Post.

By Clifford K.Berryman.

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It is perhaps for this reason that early bears were depicted with ‘sad’ expressions, having been spared of a grizzly fate (grizzly/grisly geddit? i amuse myself sometimes ha.)

It wasn’t until the 1920s that bears started having happier expressions.

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World War I soldiers often brought teddies along as companions. Sadly, not all (both teddy and human) returned to their loved ones.

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Some of the most expensive pieces in the house include this 1925 ‘Peter Bear’ by Gebruder Sussenguth, valued at RM21,000 (5000USD!). It had a hollow head with movable eyes and tongue, and was made from a moulded type of plaster called composition.

It may be 21k but to me this looks like the Annabelle of Teddies. I wouldn’t want to have it in the room, let alone sleep with it!

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The original Winnie the Pooh bear!

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In the 1940s, World War II came and due to a shortage of materials, teddies were made with shorter snouts and limbs. This is much closer to the version we see today.

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Rolling into the Rock N’Roll era, we have an Elvis-inspired teddy, complete with the singer’s signature white studded jumpsuit with flared collar.

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The Teddy Ruxpin series, which were fitted with casette tapes and could ‘read’ stories, became best selling toys in the 1980s.

The next few sections of the museum tell the story of Penang from its inception. I loved this section and spent well over an hour exploring the displays and noting small details. It really showed how much heart and effort was put into the making of these teddies and sets! 🙂

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(Above) Arrival of the British, as told through miniature teddies. Was super impressed with the level of detail !

For those not familiar with Malaysian history, Penang island was ‘founded’ in the 1700s by Captain Sir Francis Light, an Englishman for the British East India company. Foreign powers were expanding quickly in the Malayan Straits and Southeast Asia, and everyone wanted a piece of the pie. Penang’s strategic location allowed it to become a bustling centre of trade and commerce – so kudos to Light for having the foresight to ‘book’ the island under British influence.

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A large teddy version of Light.

Stories go that he was a bit of an ass though, as he leased the island from the Sultanate of Kedah with the promise that British forces would help if Siam attacked the kingdom, but then bailed on his promise. He died from malaria at the age of 54, and visitors to the Protestant Cemetery in Penang will find his tomb there.

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The next section highlighted the three main races in Peninsula Malaysia, namely Malay, Chinese and Indian.

The miniature Indian teddy set was done like a Hindu temple, complete with an intricate silver chariot pulled by bulls, kavadi-bearing teddies, temple priests, tiny coconut shells to represent the real ones used during religious festivals, and of course, teddies dressed in traditional Indian cultural garb.

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The large kavadi-bearing teddy in saffron robes and a metal rod skewered through its cheeks.

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A traditional ‘kampung’ (village) setting was used to highlight Malay culture. The ‘female’ teddies even wore tudungs, lol. In a corner (not pictured) were teddies cooking food in a kawah (cauldron) – a scene familiar to festivals and events in the kampung, where everyone pitches in to help with the preparations.

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Immensely amused that the ‘Chinese’ teddies had slits for eyes lol.

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Scene based on Penang’s famous Taoist/Buddhist temple, Kek Lok Si.

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Moving on to landmarks in Penang, we have a recreation of Siam Road’s famous char koay teow stall. They even have the owner’s grumpy expression down pat! (PS: The owner of the stall is always grumpy looking coz he has a lot of customers to serve.)

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Mini set of Gurney Drive’s hawker stalls. Again, super impressed with the level of detail. The teddies aren’t just in the same poses – we have teddies taking pictures of the food, teddies ordering, etc.

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Penang is an island after all, so of course the museum has to have a set featuring its beaches.

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Another famous attraction – Penang Hill – featuring the funicular train.

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Lol school trip with cikgu and students in uniforms.

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I could spend hours looking at the tiny details: teddy kids holding lollipops, a group of (presumably) teenage teddies with a miniature iPhone taking selfies, teddies looking through the observation binoculars.

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Typical scene at a Chinese kopitiam in Penang.

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We also have a teddy dedicated to Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic, who popularised Penang through his beautiful street murals.

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The process of making traditional batik.

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Teddy decked out in the Penang International Marathon runner’s tee. I have one of these 😀

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The dragon boat festival is one of the highlights of the island’s annual calendar.

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The museum also gives a nod to Penang’s industrial side, with these factory workers assembling electronics.

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Paying tribute to our national sporting heroes. Can you guess who they are? 😀

Here’s a short video I put together:

I really enjoyed my visit to the Teddyville Museum and it exceeded my expectations with its beautiful sets, meticulous attention to detail and wonderful showcase of Malaysian heritage. I think it’ll be a great place to take the kids to and teach them in a fun and educational way about Penang’s history and culture.

TEDDYVILLE MUSEUM

56, Jalan Low Yat, Puncak Ria, 11100 Batu Ferringhi, Pulau Pinang

*Located within DoubleTree Resort by Hilton Penang

Entry: RM36 (adults/MYKAD), RM25 (children/MYKAD)

Open daily: 9AM – 6PM

School Holiday Fun @ Sunway Lagoon’s Wildlife Adventure

Back when I was a kid, school holidays = I get to mess around the house or go on a trip with the fam. Hooray!

Now that I’m a working adult, school holidays = less traffic on the roads in the morning. So Hooray to that too!

For those with kids, even better news: Sunway Lagoon, Malaysia’s premiere theme park, is having an exciting and educational programme for the school holidays! Suitable for both kids (and the young at heart!), the Wildlife Adventure gives visitors the chance to get outdoors and spend time together, while enjoying fun and interactive activities revolving around the theme park’s mini zoo. The lineup includes a Wildlife EduHunt, Wildlife Multi-Animal Show, mystery box, animal feeding and identifying the smallest monkey in the world. 🙂

I’ve been to the mini zoo in Sunway Lagoon several times, and was always impressed by how well maintained it is as well as the number of animals they have – over 150 species from around the world ! I especially like the aviary where you can get upclose and personal to the feathered friends who roam around freely.

One of the birds with beautiful plummage you’ll find at Sunway Lagoon’s aviary.

So what’s in store for guests? Take part in the Wildlife Eduhunt Challenge, where you’ll have to complete 10 challenges ranging from Peek-A-Print, Mix & Match, Mystery Box and more, as well as collect stamps at designated spots. The best thing is, while you’re having fun, you’ll also stand a chance to win fantastic prizes, including a 2D1N stay at Sunway Resort Hotel & Spa, and a Xperia C5 Ultra Dual smartphone. The EduHunt Card can be purchased at the Main Entrance or Wildlife Park (Rimba).

 

Malaysian supermodel Amber Chia posing with an albino python and guests during the event launch! 🙂

Besides the Wildlife EduHunt, parent and child in teams of two will be able to showcase their creative and artistic side in the ‘Get Wild, Paint, Snap & Post’ contest, with 30 minutes to face paint their team partner, snap a photo and upload it to their Facebook with the hashtag #SunwayLagoonMY and #SLWildlife Adventure. The prize? A cool Fujiflim Instax Mini 8 Camera, complete with a Twin Pack Film of 20 sheet prints! 🙂

Even if you’re not into joining any challenges or contests, it’s still going to be a fun day out at the theme park exploring the mini zoo, especially since they have star attractions like lions and a white tiger. There will also be feeding sessions for swans, macaws and squirrels – a good chance for the little ones to interact with wildlife! Be entertained while watching educational Wildlife Multi-Animal Shows.

Sunway Lagoon’s Wildlife Adventure is available from now until 11 June 2017.More info: sunwaylagoon.com/wildlife-adventure/

Photos courtesy of GoCommunications PR

Bukit Jalil Recreation Park, Kuala Lumpur

Hey guys! Sorry for the lack of updates lately – I’ve been busy with real life. Blogging is like a drug to me, so I was legit getting withdrawal symptoms, thinking of all the posts waiting to be written lol.

But I digress.

So last weekend, in a fit of gungho-ness, C and I woke up early and got our asses to the Bukit Jalil Recreation Park for a morning jog. I haven’t been back here for a long time – I think since my college days – but was pleasantly surprised to find that the place is still popular with the local crowd. Guess Malaysians aren’t that lazy after all, even if we are the fattest in Southeast Asia. 😛

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Headsup:  the park is huge with slope-y terrain, so you’ll definitely get a good workout. It is also divided into several sections and has gym equipment, although not all these are well-maintained. There are loads of shady trees and the pathways are paved, but the ‘lake’, with its pool of stagnant water, needs to be cleaned.

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Even if you’re not jogging, still a nice place for a stroll.

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C doing the pushups. Power woo.

PS I never used to be able to do pushups from the floor. Now I can. Like, five. #stillachievement #sowow

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Back then, one of my favourite sections in the park is the ‘Wonders of the World’, which has small enclaves made to look like structures from different parts of the world. Stuff isn’t as well-kept now but it’s still a nice place to take photos in between your jogging session.

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Greece/Rome or some European-inspired place.

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Mini Holland, complete with wooden windmill.

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The Japanese garden with bamboo plants.

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Chinese garden, with a wall made to look like the traditional types you find in periodical dramas, a gazebo with pointy roof edges. They also have a couple of Fu-dog statues in there.

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A garden in ‘Iran’. The tiles are pretty but need a good scrubbing, and the pool seriously needs to be cleaned coz the water in it was black ._.

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The section for Thailand has a golden gazebo with a pointy roof.

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Last but not least, the ‘Peru’ garden, made to look like an ancient temple structure. I distinctly remember this because as a child, when the park was first opened, my brother and I liked to climb up to the very top and pretend we were explorers. ha !

All in all, Bukit Jalil Recreation Park is a nice place for families and those looking for a good safe spot to jog, since there are many joggers around (but not to the point that it gets crowded). Parking can be quite difficult if you come late though so come early to get the best spot.

BUKIT JALIL RECREATION PARK 

Jalan 13/155c, Bukit Jalil, 57000 Kuala Lumpur,

Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Open during daylight hours: 7am-8pm

Fun for all the Fam – Sunway Lagoon Theme Park

So earlier this week, I got to attend the TRIKSTARS media preview: it’s a magic/illusion show happening at Sunway Lagoon theme park from Dec 5 – 20. Looking forward to that !

And since I was already in the area, I hung around for a bit . 🙂 Brought E here last year when he visited Malaysia, so it sure brought back memories.

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Divided into several sections, Sunway Lagoon is pretty old, having opened its doors in 1997. I remember going there as a kid and it was always a super fun and rare treat, because Malaysians are not blessed with many big theme parks. There have been many changes and additions over the years, but the place seems to have focused more on developing its water theme park. The dry park rides are old and quite sad – there’s a small roller coaster, a Ferris Wheel, a pirate ship, a Tomahock and more family friendly rides like carousels and teacups.

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The wet park, on the other hand, is fun and exciting – especially the Vuvuzuela, the world’s largest vortex ride! The launch tower is 11 stories high and it plunges through 152m of awesomeness. I rode this a few times when I was here last year, because one time just isn’t enough. That drop from the tube into the vortex especially. 🙂

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Slides for the kiddies who can’t go on crazy rides until they’re older.

 

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The Zulu Walk area has restaurants and souvenir shops on both sides. Food is pricier than usual in the theme park. For convenience, there are no cash transactions, as you have to buy a pre-loaded card for any F&B purchases.

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Locker/changing rooms are also here.

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There is a mini zoo next to the Zulu Walk, which houses a variety of animals. At the entrance are some colourful parrots. Staff will come by to feed them and visitors can take photos with them at certain times of the day.

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The mini zoo is divided into sections. The wooden gazebo-like area houses small animals such as tortoises…

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Fluffy sleeping ferrets…

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And cute sleeping lizards.

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Over at the open-air Jungle Trail, larger wildlife can be found.

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What does the otter say? Otters make a high-pitched, clucking noise, like birds. Or hyenas. Idk.

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A sleepy, slow loris.

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And this raccoon. It was white (?). An albino, perhaps?

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It’s housemate was so fluffy it looked like a ball (!) 🙂

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Flamingoes.

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The aviary section has a small waterfall and birds/waterfowl roamed around freely. It’s a nice place to get upclose to peahens, peacocks, ducks and the like.

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Being a bird is just a state of mind. I am not defined by feathers and beaks. – Squirrel in the Aviary

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There was also a big cat display with one male and one female white lion. The enclosure was quite small for them though 😦

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Prices for the theme park have gone up since I last visited… to a whopping RM150 for adults and RM120 for children (!!) The family package for two adults and two kids is RM292. If u buy online, there’s a 15% discount.

Is it worth it? Personally, the ticket price is too pricey for me, but if you’re willing to fork out some money for a fun time without having to travel out of state, Sunway Lagoon is a nice place for family-friendly entertainment.

For more details, visit www.sunwaylagoon.com.

River and Water Conservation @ Lembah Kiara, TTDI Kuala Lumpur

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8AM: a clear, beautiful Saturday morning at the Lembah Kiara Recreational Park in Taman Tun Dr Ismail KL. It was my first time here and the park looked impressive. There were many joggers and families doing their morning exercises, or people strolling under the shady trees and admiring the big pond near the entrance.

Some construction stuff going on, but otherwise the park was nice and green. Groups of older people were doing taichi while some meditation music blasted in the background. Some families were also picnicking with mats on the grass.

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I was here to cover a CSR programme to educate primary and secondary school kids on river and water conservation. They do it once every two months and this time around it was with a group of Fifth Formers.

I think schoolkids these days are lucky because they get to join all these ‘holistic’ programmes. Back in my day (that makes me sound really old but yeah) ‘learning’ was mostly through text books because of our theory and exam-based Asian-style education.

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Part of Sungai Penchala flows through the park. The teens and their facilitators waded into the river and collected samples for testing. They also learnt about the river flora and fauna by catching river shrimps, dragonflies and other microorganisms.

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Good thing it was shady.

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The river was quite clean. You could see the base and there were tiny fish and spiders swimming about.

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The children were from an ‘eco-school’ – meaning that they adopted many green practices in their school projects. Their teacher said that they had recycled cooking oil projects which they sold to companies to be made into biodiesel. They also create compost from coffee beans collected from cafes, and make their own products such as candles to sell or as gifts at school functions.

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The samples were tested for things like dissolved oxygen content, phosphate and nitrate content, pH levels, etc to determine how ‘healthy’ the river was.

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A river shrimp.

The whole programme was pretty educational, and I suppose its more fun to wade about in rivers than just read about it in Science class. Even I learnt some stuff – like what sort of insects and organisms you’ll find in a very clean river (like stone flies) or a dirty river (maggots and the like).

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Someone meditating at the closed off waterfall feature.

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The park was huge. It took me a good 15 mins to walk from the entrance to the area where they were conducting the programme. And this was just a small part of the park.

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Lembah Kiara park is a good place to exercise at if you live in the neighbourhood. But if (ever) I can drag myself out of the bed on weekends, I don’t think a 40min drive there is worth it, especially with the crazy traffic.

Lembah Kiara Park @ Jalan Haji Openg

Taman Tun Dr Ismail, Kuala Lumpur

***I don’t think there are many buses servicing the route coz it’s like smack in the middle of housing and not within the city center. Best to take a Uber ?

*U82 from Bandar Utama is the closest but you’ll still have to walk about 650ms down the road.

Trick Art Museum, I-City Shah Alam

HOW is it like to be one of the first guests at a brand spanking new hotel? Interesting, to say the least! We were invited to a media getaway at I-City Shah Alam‘s new three-star hotel, the Best Western, with a complimentary night’s stay and free buffet meals. Since I was allowed to bring a guest, I had my mum tag along, even though my house isn’t that far away from Shah Alam. At least we got to sleep in a comfortable and spacious room with fluffy pillows and comforters and cold air conditioning.:)

As part of our trip, we were also given free reign of the various attractions within I-City.

To those who haven’t been here before, I-City is a theme park of sorts with rides, places of visit and other stuff all under one roof. It is particularly popular for itsforest of LED trees at night – but has since opened many more attractions, including the Trick Art Museum – which was our first stop of the day.

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The place is divided into five sections over two storeys of 3D-paintings, designed to look like they are ‘popping’ out of the wall. The five theme are Masterpieces, Egyptian, Marine Life, Animal Kingdom and Modern Classics. Some of the famous paintings you will see include the Mona Lisa and The Scream. There are helpful photos next to each painting for visitors to refer on how to take the perfect 3D-looking pic.

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I think youngsters and families would enjoy the place, since you can be as creative as you want with the pictures. You don’t necessarily have to follow the examples given! When we went it was afternoon so there wasn’t much of a crowd so we could take our time, but I imagined it would be a long wait if it was busy.

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Upstairs where all the other themes are located and jumbled together. Some of the paintings didn’t look very 3D though.

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Various ‘modern’ paintings depicting European life. Idk why they didn’t put in some local flavour as well.

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There were even some famous movie characters, like ET, King Kong, Spiderman, The Mummy and Batman.

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Entry tickets are priced at RM10 per person. It’s a unique concept, but there aren’t like a tonneload of exhibits on display. We were out in less than 30 minutes. But if you have families with small kids, or teens, could be a nice place to go to for the weekend + visit other attractions in the area.

Trick Art Museum@I-City 

i-City, D-1-G, Jalan Multimedia 7/AJ, Seksyen 7, Shah Alam, Selangor

Opening hours: Daily (11am -12am/1am on holidays)

Entry: RM10

 

Things to Do at UK Farm Agro Resort Johor, Malaysia – Goat Feeding, Mushroom Farm, etc.

If you’re looking for an experience beyond the usual shopping malls and tourist spots, well. How about visiting a farm?

Established in 2003, UK Farm is located in Kluang Johor, a good three-hour-drive from Kuala Lumpur. Here, visitors can go on guided tours through the largest goat farm in the country.  It also has a mini zoo area, fruit/vegetable/mushroom farm enclosures, picturesque fields and a gimmicky Orang Asli Jakun (aborigine) village. The fam and I came here for a weekend trip, and it was an interesting experience for this born-and-bred city girl.

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The place caters mainly to Chinese visitors, as the tours are conducted in Mandarin and most of the signs are in Chinese. We waited in a park for the ‘bus’ to arrive. There was a giant goat statue in the middle of the park.

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There are horses on the farm, which are used to pull carts with tourists. This one was really sweet and gentle.

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The ‘bus’ was really just a converted lorry, with makeshift wooden beams holding up a roof. The ride to the first stop, the mill, took about three minutes.

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Here, a guide explained to us (in Mandarin.. earning confused looks from my dad who can’t speak Mandarin to save his life) about the feed process, whereby the bushels of grass are cut into smaller blades and fed through a grinder.

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Just next door was the pen, which housed hundreds of goats. They were mostly white, and there were two distinct types – the one with pointy ears and the ones with long droopy ears like Anjali from The Hunchback of Notredame.

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We fed them grass, and while attempting to take a selfie, one of the goats mistook my hair for food lol. I know I don’t have luscious locks but come on.

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The goats were really sweet and didn’t bite at all (except if you counted the one that tried to chew my hair off.)I felt a bit sickened at the thought that they were destined for the slaughterhouse. I guess it feels different because I actually got to see them on the farm. A lot of times people (myself included) ignore the fact that these are animals raised for their meat – because we often get our meat nicely packaged, sealed and cut up. We forget that these are real, live animals.

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It is not common among Western cultures to eat goat meat, but goat is common in Malaysia, especially when cooked with curries and spicy sauces, as it tastes strong and gamey.

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And wtf these kids were so cute all huddled up in a bundle while they were sleeping. T-T

I shall refrain from consuming mutton if I can help it.

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Another short bus ride later, we got to the ‘milking station’. The goats were all lined up in a row with their butts facing the handlers. Their udders were full and swollen at this point, so the workers placed them in a pumping machine and the milk just started squirting out.  The workers then helped by squeezing any remaining milk left over until the udders were saggy and thin again.

The guide said that it didn’t hurt the goats… because if you left the milk in the udders, it would hurt them even more coz they’d get swollen and uncomfortable.

One goat can produce about 1.5L of milk per day. That’s a lot!

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Pasteurised goat milk. It tastes kind of gamey. Goat milk apparently has a lot of beneficial properties, especially for those who can’t take cow’s milk and are lactose intolerant.

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We hopped on the bus to our next stop – the ‘Ostrich Farm’.

The pens were fairly big, but there was only one ostrich out and about. The other two were resting in the shade. We were given corn feed, but the poor ostrich must have been overstuffed because there were too many people attempting to feed it. Annoying, ill mannered children threw the feed into the ostrich’s coat and it clucked at them impatiently. disapproving grunt. I don’t remember being such a pain in the ass when I was young. Kids these days #youknowyouoldwhenyousaythat 

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Just a minute’s walk away was the ‘Orang Asli’ (aborigine) village…. although technically, there was only one ‘villager/employee’ there. He introduced himself as one of the Jakun people from neighbouring Pahang state. The quaint wooden houses with atap roofs were reminiscent of traditional Orang Asli homes. Everything was very basic, with only one room per house.

The kids loved the tree house. I was too big to climb up.

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They caught a ‘wild’ animal lul.

The guy also demonstrated how to shoot a dart using a blowpipe, by bursting a balloon far up in the tree. Wouldn’t want to mess with him

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We stopped by for a rest at a restaurant/souvenir shop area. What are these creepy masks

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Then there was the mushroom farm, where they had a pretty ‘wishing tree’ complete with small wooden gazebo on top and hundreds of prayers from visitors.

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Inside the damp and dark mushroom farm area. I didn’t know they grew them in bottles stuffed with wood shavings and moist earth. They even had ‘lingzhi’, which is a type of fungus prized for its medicinal properties (and very expensive!)

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We tried a few mushrooms snacks, like monkey head ‘satay’ sticks and spicy mushroom/vege salad.

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A board where visitors could leave messages and doodles.

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Our last stop was a mini ‘zoo’ area near the entrance, where chickens, ducks and fowls ran rampant. There was a paddock where visitors paid money to try and catch a herd of goats (?). You get a medal if you manage to catch one. Most of the times, they didn’t but it was hilarious watching people attempt to lol.

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Most. Informative. Board. Ever.

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Le fluffehz. They kept twerking their little butts, so cute.

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We finished our tour with some refreshing passion fruit drinks and goat’s milk ice-cream. The whole visit took about three hours.

If you’re bored and would like a day trip, UK Farm is a good choice to spend a few hours. It’s also educational, both for adults and children – a great place for family or student trips. The entry price is RM47 for adults and RM37 for children; including a bottle for goat feeding, corn and grass feed, as well as snacks.

I think the owners of the farm have excellent entrepreneurship, because aside from just running the farm, they’ve created this tourist destination where people can come and buy products, mingle with the livestock and get educated on the farming process. They even have chalets available for rent, for those who would like a taste of farm/country life.

GETTING THERE 

There are no buses servicing the route, so if you’re not driving, a taxi is your best choice. If you are coming from KL and using the North South Expressway, take the Air Hitam exit. Further down the road there will be many signs guiding you to the farm.

UK FARM/AGRO RESORT 

Plot 8, Project Pertanian Moden Kluang, KM13 Jalan Batu Pahat,
86000 Kluang, Johor, Malaysia.
Tel : +607-759 7555
Fax : +607-759 7991
H/P : 013-778 7235 / 013 – 722 2299
Website: www.ukfarm.com.my
Email: info@ukfarm.com.my