9 Must-Have Hari Raya Dishes For the Festive Season

Ramadan Kareem!

Last week marked the start of Ramadan, the holiest month in Islam, when Muslims around the world observe fasting from dawn until dusk. In Malaysia, this is usually a time for Ramadan bazaars – but these have been cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic. Some states have come up with innovative ways to help traders, such as through delivery services – and while it may not come close to the festive atmosphere at an actual food bazaar, it’s the best option to ensure that we still get to enjoy some food, help out the traders and most importantly, keep safe and healthy.

After Ramadan comes Eid, known colloquially as Hari Raya Aidilfitri, on May 24. Just like Christmas is celebrated in Western countries as a time for family and togetherness, so is Hari Raya to Muslims. But with travel restrictions expected to be put into place to avoid an exodus of city folk returning to their hometowns (which might cause another wave of infections), members of the public are faced with a very bleak and lonely Hari Raya.

Not all is doom and gloom, however. An essential part of any celebration is food – and I’m pretty sure that we’ll still be able to enjoy some scrumptious Raya dishes: perhaps not at a friend’s open house or a family gathering, but from a restaurant, small-time traders (whom we should definitely support), or if you can make it at home – then all the better!

Rendang 

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Photo credit: Kyle Lam via Flickr

No Hari Raya celebration would be complete without rendang – a spicy slow-cooked meat dish braised in coconut milk and spices. There are many different ways to make it, depending on the state/region you’re from. (One thing it is not, however, is crispy.) Typically, a protein such as chicken, beef or lamb is used, but there are also versions made with seafood like fish, shrimp, crab, squid and cockles. The rendang that I am most familiar with is the regular rendang daging, which is drier than curry but still has plenty of gravy that is excellent with rice. A lot of work goes into making good rendang, with ingredients such as coconut milk (santan) and a paste of mixed ground spices such as ginger, galangal, turmeric leaves, lemongrass, garlic, shallots, chillies and more.

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The rendang from Negeri Sembilan – a state with a large Minangkabau diaspora – has a distinctively Padang influence, with heavy use of turmeric, chilli and santan which gives it a distinctively lighter colour. They also like to use smoked duck as the meat – another Negeri Sembilan specialty. Rendang Tok from the state of Perak, on the other hand, is very dry with little to no gravy, and uses a liberal amount of kerisik (pounded, toasted coconut) and larger chunks of meat that is slow-cooked until tender. My personal favourite? Rendang paru, made from cow lungs. Not very healthy, but t I only have it once a year. 😛

Lemang 

Lemang

Photo credit: zol m via Flickr 

A lot of Hari Raya dishes have strong flavours + gravy, and are made to be eaten with rice. So you definitely can’t miss out on lemang, essentially glutinous rice, salt and coconut milkin a hollowed-out piece of bamboo and grilled over an outdoor fire. You might think it’s easy to chuck rice into bamboo and grill it, but the ‘simplest’ things are often the hardest to execute. The bamboo can’t be too soft or it will break easily, but neither can it be too hard as it will take too long to cook the rice. Maintaining control of the fire and heat is essential, which can be challenging when you’re working with an open fire. The bamboo also has to be turned over constantly, to ensure the rice is cooked evenly and thoroughly. The final result? A slightly sticky, chewy rice with a smoky aftertaste – perfect to go with curry, rendang and serunding (meat floss). 

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Lemang periuk kera, which features rice stuffed into pitcher plants, has become very popular in the last couple of years – although naturalists discourage eating it due to fears that the plant will be over-collected in order to meet demands.

Ketupat 

Ketupat

Photo credit: Sham Hardy via Flickr 

Andddd we have the poster child for Hari Raya – ketupat, or compressed rice. The image of ketupat nasi, housed in iconic diamond-shaped containers woven out of palm leaves, is synonymous with Hari Raya in Malaysia. Like lemang, ketupat is meant to be eaten with all the savoury, curry and gravy-based dishes. Aside from ketupat nasi, there is also ketupat daun palas, which is triangular in shape and made with glutinous rice.  If you can’t get your fill of rice, look out for nasi impit which is basically rice compressed into squares – makes for easy eating! 

Masak Lemak 

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While it’s literally translated to ‘cooked in fat’, masak lemak actually refers to a style of cooking that incorporates coconut milk (yes, we use a lot of that here). The dish is usually prepared with meat such as chicken, beef, fish, seafood and even vegetables. Masak Lemak Cili Api is popular in Negeri Sembilan and has a vibrant yellow colour, with birds-eye chillies thrown in (they’re pretty spicy at 50,000 – 100,000 Scoville units!) alongside turmeric and other spices. For something milder on the palate, there’s Masak Lemak Putih, which is white in colour and often uses vegetables such as cabbage and pumpkin. 

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Masak lemak putih with pumpkin and spinach

Satay

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Satay may not be Hari Raya “exclusive”, but it is certainly part of any Hari Raya gathering worth its salt. And who doesn’t like smoky barbecued meat on skewers, grilled over a charcoal fire? Most common meats are chicken and beef, less common are lamb and seafood. Of course, you can’t miss out on the peanut sauce and nasi impit. Tone down the spice with some cucumber and onions.

Kambing Panggang 

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Again, not Raya exclusive, but you’ll often find it at major festivals in Malaysia celebrated by the Malay community. You’ll often find whole roasted lamb at Ramadan bazaars or at buka puasa/ Hari Raya buffets at hotels, served with black pepper or mushroom sauce.

Sambal based dishes

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Curry-based and masak lemak-based cooking form a large part of Malay and Indonesian cuisine. Rounding it off are sambal-based dishes, which are typically made from a sauce or paste featuring chilli, shrimp paste, garlic, ginger, shallots and other spices. Sambal dishes are very common during Hari Raya – my favourite being sambal sotong (squid), which comes in a spicy, rich and thick, sweet gravy.

Bubur 

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There’s something very hearty and comforting about the humble porridge – perhaps because it is easy to digest, tasty, and warms/fills the belly right up. There are both sweet and savoury variants. Bubur Lambuk, a spiced meat porridge, is a popular dish for breaking fast during Ramadan, and it is also served during Hari Raya. Again, like Rendang, different states have their own versions. The east coast of Peninsular Malaysia uses fish meat and fresh herbs such as fern and cassava leaves, while Bubur Lambuk Utara from the northern states of Malaysia contains egg, shredded chickens and nuts. Personally, I like dessert bubur that uses local fruits and ingredients, such as black sesame, mungbean, red bean and pengat pisang (banana porridge? although it’s more like a stew rather than a bubur per se).

Kuih-Muih 

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Ending this post on a sweet note, we have kuih muih. It’s hard to classify what kuih muih is as they come in all sorts of colours, shapes and flavours –  the best I can describe it is an assortment of cakes, sweets, cookies and snacks. Traditional favourites that are commonly seen during Raya include Kuih Koci – a glutinous rice dumpling with a palm sugar-filled centre, onde-onde (chewy glutinous rice balls with shredded coconut), kuih bakar (baked pandan cake), lepat pisang (steamed banana cake wrapped in banana leaves), talam ubi (tapioca cake) and kuih seri muka (a two layered white and green cake).

 

What are some of your Hari Raya favourites? If you celebrate Eid in other parts of the world, let me know in the comments about some of your traditional dishes!

 

 

 

 

 

FERN launches Hari Raya Collection, Inspired by Morocco

Hey guys! I hope you’re all holding up well, wherever you are.

Hari Raya (Eid), which falls on May 23 this year, is just around the corner. Obviously it’s going to be a subdued affair – but I figured we all need something other than depressing reports on COVID 19, so here’s some exciting news for the fashionistas.

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Known for its elegant batik wear, local design house FERN has announced its latest Raya collection called The Moroccan Series – inspired by the landscape, beautiful nature, people as well as rich culture, history and traditions of Morocco. Blending Moorish architecture and nature motifs, the collection will feature FERN’s trademark designs blended with a variety of elements, from the landscapes of the Sahara desert and Atlas Mountains, the night sky filled with stars and the beautiful damask rose, to the intense blue tones of the little town of Chefchaouen, palm trees towering over its streets, and beautiful mosaic patterns filling the Medina of Fez.

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Fern Chua, founder and designer of Fern, says the inspiration for the collection came from a visit to Morocco last year.

“There is a certain charm to the elements found in Morocco. Being a Muslim country, there are many similar motifs that are also found here in Malaysia. A keen eye could see the interpretation and use of Islamic geometric influence in most Muslim countries. Combining local and foreign silhouettes while staying true to the FERN identity proves to be my biggest challenge. The similarities between the two countries is what I look to connect with for my Raya collection this year through the Moroccan Series,” she says.

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The Moroccan Series Raya collection will showcase 15 patterns which entails a mix of block prints and abstract prints drawn from the Sahara, palms and roses, and will have up to 20 looks – FERN’s biggest collection yet. Made with high quality natural materials and designed with versatility in mind, the Raya 2020 collection aims to create unique looks for individuals from all walks of life. In addition to the collection, a range of jewellery made by local Moroccan artists are also introduced to complete the looks.

Pre-orders for The Moroccan Series can be made online now on fern.gallery. 

Here are some more of my favourite looks from the collection! I like how some of them are suitable even for daily wear.

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**Photos courtesy of FERN. 

Ramadan Bazaar @ Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi

It’s the holy month of Ramadan here in Malaysia, which is a big deal since most of the population is Muslim. From sahur (dawn) til dusk, they refrain from eating or drinking. Ramadan also means bazaars – an annual affair where traders set up stalls (much like an evening food market) with lots of delectable dishes so that people can buy food and break their fast at home.

I had to go around looking for interesting stalls to be featured in the paper where I work at, so here are a few nice picks from the bazaar at Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi, Sepang!

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Adie and Abdul Aziz’s Gerai John Kupang 

Their specialty? Mussels cooked in a spicy sauce made from garlic, chilli, curry powder and other herbs/spices. Upon passing by their stall, the wafting aroma from the big woks filled to the brim with shellfish is enough to make anyone’s mouth water. At only RM5 (1.57 USD) per serving, this is one store you probably wanna give a try if you’re ever in the area. 🙂

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“We sell about 50kgs per day,” said one of the owners, Adie. The pair learned their cooking skills from working in the hotel industry. The mussels are brought in fresh daily from Malacca, because ‘the ones at pasar borong (wet markets) are put on ice and not that fresh’ – Adie.

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The bazaar itself stretches from one end of the road to the other; at least 50 stalls. Traffic is closed from around 3pm til 7pm to cater to the crowds.

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Thirst quenchers were hot selling items at the bazaar, such as these sweet lotus seeds (lin chee kang), a refreshing beverage with basil (selasih) and chewy tapioca balls. The colourful green, yellow and pink layers make for a very eye-catching display. One packet costs RM3 (0.94 USD).

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One of the hot selling items according to the drink stall owner is the Kathira (the green drink), a Ramadhan specialty. It is made from a combination of local fruits and herbs (?) including basil, kembang semangkuk and getah anggur. The Sanggar Biru (blue drink) is a mixture of longan and coconut water. Sounds very refreshing.

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Other varieties. The colouring in them doe.

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Another stall drawing in the crowds was the one next to the drinks stall, selling fresh off the grill lamb and chicken skewers. Prepared by one Mr Nor Azri, the kebabs are seasoned with chilli and pepper before being cooked for about five minutes to ensure tender, well-cooked perfection. Customers did not seem to mind the wait, judging from the long, patient line snaking away from the stall.

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Large slabs of soft and fluffy looking cheesecake in various flavours, such as tiramisu, red velvet, plain and chocolate. Who canz resist cheezcakez? 

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Spiced and marinated grilled chicken wings going for RM1.50 each. One can opt for other parts to be grilled on skewers, such as the gizzard, liver and heart. Pedal ayam (chicken gizzard)  is seriously the best. That chewy texture. Rawr.

If you’re ever around Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi this fasting month, check out the Ramadan bazaar near Jalan Kosmoplek 1! Guaranteed not to disappoint.