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Chee Cheong Fun @ Restaurant King, Batu 14 Puchong

When mentioning food in Batu 14 in Puchong, many would think of the famous Puchong Yong Tao Foo or Yap Chuan Bak Kut Teh. If you like simple and tasty fare, I’m here to introduce another place you can check out in the neighbourhood – Restaurant King, which specializes in chee cheong fun (rice rolls)!

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The shop is a simple, standalone structure, with an air conditioned dining area within. Outside you’ll find staff steaming rice rolls, frying up prawn fritters, and chopping up roasties.

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The menu offers a good variety. You can get their specialty – the steamed rice rolls – or other items such as rice with roasties (roast pork, chicken, etc.), porridge and soup, as well as dim sum and snacks. The dimsum is not the freshly made variety, but the standard ones you get from most kopitiams or food trucks.

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Fun fact: chee cheong fun has an interesting moniker – it translates to something like ‘pig’s intestine noodles’. This is due to their elongated shape, slightly transclucent appearance, and elastic texture. The noodles are made from rice flour; the mix is poured over a hot flat surface until it solidifies into a sheet, before being ‘rolled’ into it’s final shape. It’s a very versatile dish and can be served in numerous ways: in different parts of Malaysia with a Chinese diaspora, we’ve adapted it to suit our Malaysian-Chinese taste buds. Penang chee cheong fun, for example, is served with dark sauce, chilli, and shrimp paste, while in Ipoh, they serve it with mushroom sauce.

Restaurant King specializes in Hong Kong style chee cheong fun, where various meats such as char siew – bbq pork, and shrimp, are rolled into the noodles and act as a filling. The noodles are then drenched in light soy sauce, and topped with fried shallots.

I quite enjoy the version here! They’ve stuffed it generously with fried onions, the char siew has a gentle and smoky sweet taste, and the noodles are smooth on the surface with a chewy texture. Price ranges from around RM8 to RM13 for the chee cheong fun.

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The Hubs has mostly enjoyed Malaysian food so far, but for some reason he does not like chee cheong fun (that, and apparently I traumatised him the first time we ate Bak kut teh by ordering too much). So he ordered rice with char siew instead. It was decent; the char siew was not too fatty, and the sauce was well balanced.

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My personal favourite has got to be their shrimp fritters (har beng). Some people like their fritters to be thin and crunchy, but I prefer the version here which is quite thick and loaded with shrimp.

Despite the thickness, they’re very crunchy on the outside. Restaurant King’s fritters do not feel greasy at all, so I don’t get that cloying feeling after more than a few bites. The garlicky chilli sauce also helps to cut through the greasiness. Order a glass of calamansi sour plum (kat zai suen mui) and you’re all set!

PS: Hubs also had a char siew bao, but it was pretty ordinary. Nice fluffy bun but lacked filling.

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And there you have it! A simple but satisfying meal for breakfast or lunch that won’t break the bank. It’s definitely one of those places you can come to regularly if you live around the area. Service is decent as well.

RESTAURANT KING

Lorong Jejawi, Kampung Baru Batu 14 Puchong, 47100 Puchong, Selangor. (across the road from SJKC Han Ming)

Open: 7.30AM – 6PM (Closed Mondays)

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