Batik Making Centre, Denpasar, Bali

After our Barong dance show in the morning, Toto took us to a Batik making factory in Denpasar. Bali being a tourist island, they have clusters of these shops in certain areas. This spot has all the batik centres, while another has wood craft, silver and gold. They’re obviously tourist traps, because the prices are way over. Outside the souvenir shop, some staff members demonstrate the process of batik making.

Batik is a traditional cloth made from wax-resist dyeing technique. (Pic) The staff use hot wax pens to draw out the patterns. They didn’t need corrections, everything was done in one stroke. So wow. The air was pungent with the smell of steel shavings and wax, which hurt my teeth and nostrils lol.

An old-school weaving press. Each line of the batik is woven painstakingly. Line by line. A cloth might take days to finish. Which is also why you have such beautiful, intricate detail, and the reason why batik is so expensive.

Upstairs was a gallery for batik paintings. We weren’t allowed pictures, but I managed to sneak in a few…

Familiar? This is a colourful depiction of the Barong, the mythical lion in Balinese culture and which we saw at the dance that morning.

Even in the batik paintings, elements of Balinese culture which is strongly influenced by Hinduism is present.

Some of the paintings were pretty affordable, but mum figured it would be difficult to stuff it in our luggage lol.

Til next post!

 

 

Seafood by the Ocean @ Jimbaran / Exploring Kuta Beach, Bali

Hullo, and welcome to the next part of my Indonesian trip! We visited Kuta, a famous stretch of beach and about the most touristy places you can ever go to in Bali. Surrounded by blocks of shopping malls, little shops selling souvenirs (prices are up for haggling), chic bars, clubs and restaurants, it wouldn’t be a place for a quiet getaway lol.

Toto drove us through the traffic and we got down for a quick visit. The beach was dirty because it was monsoon season, but they have regular patrols to clean up. It was late evening though so I guess they didn’t clear up the rubbish in time. The beach was super long and the waves were high, unlike in Malaysia. Surfing is common here. The wind was also super strong because of it’s flat, open landscape. Be prepared to get dust in your eyes.

Beach. Photo from dad’s phone.

It was then on to Jimbaran for dinner. Many restaurants line the beach, with soft candlelight illuminating the tables. Very romantic…if not for the strong wind blowing sand in everyone’s faces. We chose to sit inside the restaurant. The sunset view was magnificent.

Dinner was a platter of seafood items – grilled fish, squid, shrimp, and clams. The taste was so-so. I liked the clams, but they only gave us two each. The price came up to 400,000 rupiah (RM128+ or USD 30) for all of us.

The seafood is freshly picked and grilled. Lots of aquariums with fish in them, where customers can pick out their choice on the spot.

Guests sitting outside will be able to enjoy traditional Balinese dances on stage. I love their costume detail.

All in all, I think Kuta and Jimbaran are pretty touristy places to visit in Bali, although that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t check them out. There’s good, cheap seafood and a relatively nice (albeit crowded) beach.