Day Trip to Bukit Malawati, Kuala Selangor

The beauty about living in Malaysia is that as a multicultural society, we have loads of holidays for each of the major ethnic groups/religions in Malaysia. So even though I don’t celebrate the Muslim festival of Eid-al-Fitr (or Hari Raya as it’s known colloquially), my office still gave us a three-day break. Plus the weekend, I had five days off – plenty of time for some R&R!

The Hubs and I did not plan to go to the usual tourist places like Penang/Malacca, as the highways were extremely congested – but we did a short day trip to Kuala Selangor, where we got into some… monkey business. Literally.

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Located about 70km from Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Selangor, or “Estuary of Selangor”, lies at the point where the Selangor River meets the sea. Surrounded by forest and mangroves, it was once the capital of the Selangor sultanate in the 18th century, thanks to its strategic location. Today, the town oozes a sleepy, laidback vibe, but is well equipped with facillities, including major banks, a school for sciences, a firestation, and places of worship.

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We arrived a little after lunch and hopped onto the tram (a modified vehicle with carriages attached to a tractor). For RM5 (locals) and RM10 (foreigners), it ferries you up to the top of Bukit Malawati. Along the way, you’ll pass by large boulders on the hillside – all that remains of the ancient Malawati Fort.

Built during the Malacca Sultanate in the 16th century, the fort offered a strategic vantage point, with its steep hill face and surrounding mangrove swaps acting as natural defensive ramparts. It fell to Dutch invasion in the 18th century, and they renamed it Altingburg, fortifying its walls and strengthening the fort with cannons. They also built a lighthouse on top of the hill. A year later, a surprise attack by Selangor sultanate forces drove the Dutch back to sea. It remained under Malay rule until the late 19th century, when British gunboats pounded the walls to smithereens.

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These days, people come for more than just the history: they come to see monkeys! A colony of silverleafed monkeys (and a couple of macaques) call the hill summit home. Because the hill is a tourist attraction, the primates are used to humans, and are reliant on them for their source of food. There are peddlers here selling food like bananas and fruits that you can feed to the animals, but beware because the animals will climb onto you to get your food.

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The silverleafed monkey, or silvery lutung, is an Old World ape endemic to the forests of Sumatra, Borneo, and Peninsular Malaysia. They are categorized as vulnerable, with populations declining due to deforestation and loss of habitat. Like their namesake, they have silvery fur, although babies are golden with pale skin.

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The summit of the hill is the highest point for miles around, affording visitors panoramic views of the river winding towards the sea. There are a couple of canons here as well, but I’m not sure if they are well preserved originals or just replicas.

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Also here you will find the Baitulhilal, a moonsighting pavilion, which I believe our Muslim religious authorities use to sight the moon on the eve of Ramadhan, which would then signify the beginning of the holy month.

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Another prominent landmark here is the Altingsburg Lighthouse, built by the Dutch and spruced up by the British almost a century on. Unfortunately you can’t access the buildling, but the views from the outside are still great, and it looks well maintained. Within its grounds is a museum chronicling the history of the fort, but it wasn’t open during our visit.

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We spent some time enjoying the sea breeze under the cool shade of the trees while watching the monkeys. It was fascinating to see them interacting with each other; relaxing on the branches, playfully chasing one another, jumping across branches, fighting, grooming – very human interactions.

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If you’re up to a walk around the area, there are a couple of interesting historical attractions to see, including a Poisoned Well, where traitors were apparently lowered into a mix of poisonous latex and juice from bamboo shoots, undergoing a slow and painful death. There’s also a large stone slab, where legend has it that a palace maiden was beheaded for adultery.

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We spent about an hour on the summit, before returning to town and driving 2 minutes away (the weather was scorching, it wasn’t coz we were lazy lol) to Auntie Foo, a cafe in the middle of town. Only outdoor seating was available as they told us the inside was ‘reserved’ (we came and went, but no one showed up though) – so we had to sit on the verandah. It was still fairly cool, as are most of the old shophouses. Perhaps something to do with the design and materials used in the old days?

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Auntie Foo serves mostly Western and Asian fare. We already had lunch, so we got some dessert to quench our thirst and cool down from the sweltering heat. The cendol was nice but the portion was small; the Hubs gulped it down within two mouthfuls. The Ais Kacang, on the other hand, was humongous, topped with a dollop of sweet vanilla ice cream, crushed peanuts, rose syrup, and other goodies.

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The cafe also sells souvenirs and handicrafts.

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Aside from visiting the hill and its monkeys, there are a lot of other things you can do in Kuala Selangor, namely firefly watching at night on the river, and taking photos at the Sasaran Sky Mirror beach (which is often dubbed the Salar Uyuni of Malaysia, because the beach appears like a mirror at certain hours of the day). You can also go eagle feeding, or take a hike at the Kuala Selangor Nature Park.

As our trip was kinda spontaneous, we were content with just visiting Bukit Malawati and enjoying the relaxing drive. If you like the laidback vibe of small towns, history, and nature, it’s worth the drive for a daytrip, or even an overnight stay as there are plenty of homestays and boutique hotels around.

Getting There

Kuala Selangor is best accessed by car. Driving along the North-South Highway, exit at Sungai Buloh and follow the signs towards Kuala Selangor. There are buses plying the route as well, but I wasn’t able to find updated information online.

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Taco Bell, IOI Boulevard Puchong

Growing up, I often wondered what Taco Bell tasted like. What was this Tex-Mex inspired cuisine that Americans seem to enjoy so much in TV series and dramas? This was back in the 90s and 2000s, when Tex-Mex food wasn’t as popular as it is today, and places serving them in Malaysia were few and far between (other than, perhaps, Chili’s).

Since then, Tex-Mex joints have quadrupled, often in the form of food trucks and casual eateries serving burritos, nachos, quesadillas, and the like. With Taco Bell officially making its entry into Malaysia in the last couple of months – and the fanfare it has received – it seems like the era of Tex-Mex is finally coming into its own.

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Recently, The Hubs and I spotted a Taco Bell branch at IOI Boulevard, Puchong – and thought of checking it out. It has been about six months since Taco Bell opened its first outlet, so the hype has died down a little (when it first opened, queues at their Cyberjaya branch lasted hours).

During our visit to the Puchong branch, the shop was busy, but there was still seating available outdoors.

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Bright and cheerful interior packed with a lunch crowd, mostly comprising youngsters and office workers.

The menu features signatures like tacos (both soft and hard shell versions), burritos, rice bowls with beans and vegetables, wraps, and quesadillas. You get to choose from different proteins, such as chicken, beef, and beans. Meals are paired with sides of nachos or fries, and refillable drinks. After you order at the counter, they give you a device that will alert you when your food is ready for collection.

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Our orders: N’s beef burrito with fries, and my chicken quesadilla with nachos.

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My chicken quesadilla was excellent. The tortilla was soft, they were generous with the cheese, and since the meal was served warm, the cheese was still stretchy and oozy, while the chicken meat was tender and juicy. Just a great quesadilla overall. The nachos, which are spiced with what I guess is paprika (?) was crazy addictive. Next time around I might go for the loaded nachos, which are piled high with avocado guacamole, pico de gallo salsa, sour cream, and cheese sauce.

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Bubbly, oozy cheese.

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The Hub’s fries were good too: freshly fried, thick cut, and well seasoned. The burrito was packed to bursting, with moist and juicy beef pairing well with the vegetables.

Overall, I think Taco Bell lives up to its reputation and I can see why it has become such an iconic part of American West Coast food and pop culture. I think it’s also a nice change from our usual fast food joints that serve burgers and fried chicken. Will be back to try their other menu items!

PS: Prices are average for a fast food place; set meals cost around RM15++.

TACO BELL (PUCHONG)

F-21-G, IOI Boulevard Puchong, Jalan Kenari 6, Bandar Puchong Jaya, 47100 Puchong, Selangor

Opening hours: 10AM – 11PM

tacobell.com.my

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Okonomi @ Tokyo Street, Pavilion KL

Another day, another food adventure – this time at Pavilion KL’s Tokyo Street!

Much like J’s Gate Dining at Lot 10 Shopping Centre next door, Tokyo Street houses a slew of Japanese eateries, serving everything from shabu-shabu (hotpot) and sushi, to authentic matcha desserts. We had our sights set on Okonomi, a casual spot specializing in – what else – okonomiyaki.

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For the uninitiated, okonomiyaki is a Japanese savoury pancake, comprising shredded cabbage mixed with batter and items such as pork, shrimp, beef, or even cheese. It is flattened and cooked on a teppan (hotplate) before topping with okonomiyaki sauce, dried seaweed flakes, and katsuoboshi (bonito flakes).

The word is a portmanteau of okonomi (meaning ‘as you like’, or kinda like the ‘chef’s special’) and yaki (fried) – a fitting name, seeing as how the dish is basically a mix of different ingredients. Different regions in Japan have their own unique versions, but the one that is most common is Osaka-style, where it was popularised. Trivia: okonomiyaki is also nicknamed “Osaka soul food” !

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The shop is cozy, with wooden furniture and a warm, earthen colour scheme. A large section of the restaurant is dominated by the kitchen, which features a teppan (grill). The cooking area is separated from the dining area by glass.

The appeal of such a setup is that guests will be able to sit at the counter and experience the food with all the senses. It almost feels like a performance, as resident chef Takeshi Wada whips up dishes right before your eyes; you smell the aroma of food cooking on the grill, and hear the satisfying sizzle of more ingredients being added to the hotplate.

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For best value, order the set meals, which come with rice, side dishes, miso soup, and dessert. While okonomiyaki is the main attraction, there’s a good selection of other grilled items as well, such as yakiniku (beef), pork belly, and salmon.

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If you’re feeling fancy, opt for premium orders such as the wagyu sirloin and Iberico pork chop.

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Complimentary edamame as appetiser
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Our first order of the day was one of their signatures: Spicy yakisoba (RM20). This was da bomb. The wheat flour noodles were cooked perfectly and had a chewy, al dente texture, each strand coated in a sweet and savoury sauce.

We couldn’t place the unique flavour while we were dining, but I googled it later and apparently the ‘base’ is a Worchestershire sauce, which explains the rich, full-bodied flavour. In terms of freshness, you can’t get any fresher than noodles curling around on the plate like they were wriggling lol, because the heat was making the strands contract. To top it off, shavings of katsuoboshi and dried seaweed flakes.

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Unfortunately, after the star performance of the yakisoba, the okonomiyaki (shrimp and pork – they ran out of squid, so they gave us extra shrimp) felt a little underwhelming. It was still tasty, but the sauces and toppings were very similar in taste to the noodles, but did not pair as well. I also felt that the shredded cabbage had a bitter aftertaste, which sort of ruined the enjoyment for me.

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Last but not least came the fried omelette with pork belly (RM10). The omelette was fluffy and stuffed with tender slices of pork and onions.

Here’s an extremely thoughtful gesture: I ordered one dish, but was surprised to see that two portions came. At first I thought that the server mistakenly keyed in two orders, but it turns out Chef Wada made them so that the Hubs and I would each get an individual portion. Which I think is awesome; that he pays mind to these details. It reminds me of omotenashi, or the Japanese concept of hospitality which centres around going above and beyond to make sure guests are well taken care of.

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That being said, there’s one thing to remember when dining at Okonomi: be patient. During our visit, the shop was at full capacity (about 20 pax). Since Chef Wada was the only one preparing the food, and they are all made to order, our dishes took a long time to get to our table. But hey, good things are worth the wait!

If you want a taste of authentic Osaka-style okonomiyaki, Okonomi checks all the boxes. I do think they make good okonomiyaki – it’s just that I’m not a big fan of the dish itself; it has nothing to do with the chef’s skills.

As for the Hubs and I, we’ve already made plans to return for the phenomenal yakisoba.

OKONOMI BY TOKYO DON

Lot 6 . 24 . 1C, Level 6, Tokyo Street, Pavilion KL, 168, Jln Bukit Bintang, Bukit Bintang, 55100 Kuala Lumpur

Opening hours: 11AM – 9PM (daily)

Purradise Cat Cafe, TTDI

Pets, be it cats, dogs, or other small animals, can be a source of comfort and support. Research has shown that interacting with pets lowers the stress hormone cortisol and lowers blood pressure, whilst also providing social support and reducing loneliness.

Unfortunately, not everyone is able to keep pets at home (like yours truly) – so the next best thing is to visit a pet cafe.

One of my favourite places to go to for a mood booster is Purradise Cat Cafe in TTDI, KL. Established in 2015, it is considered a pioneer in the cat cafe scene. What makes the place special is that these are not fancy, pure bred cats, but animals that have been rescued off the streets. I brought the Hubs here recently since he also likes cats, and we had a purr-fect time chilling with the kitties!

Video:

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It has been awhile since my last visit, as I was not able to come during the pandemic. The space largely looks the same: beanbags, a few tables with high stools, and lots of nooks and crannies for the cats to hide in. I also like that they have a catwalk above, because cats have a natural instinct to protect themselves and like high vantage points.

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Entry to the cafe is RM21 per hour, inclusive of a drink. The price is a little steep, but personally, it’s a price I’m willing to pay to be around the cats and also support the establishment. You’ll have to keep track of the time yourself, though, as they charge an additional fee every 15 minutes after your hour is up.

There is a board with helpful tips on how to interact with the cats. The staff member on duty explained to us which cats tend to be friendly, and which are grumpy.

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There are close to 20 cats in the cafe; not all of them were in the common area during our visit, so I’m guessing they rotate the cats at different hours of the day. We were there around 2PM; most of the cats were just chilling, while others were in a playful mood, so I think we caught them at the right time. The last time I was here, I didn’t get to pet any cats at all because they were all grumpy. I still enjoyed my time immensely though, because just being around them makes me happy.

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Manage expectations when it comes to food, because although they call themselves a cafe, this is not a proper eatery. What they have on their limited menu is pretty decent though; the Hubs and I both got iced chocolate drinks, which were served with paper straws. Some people might find it unpleasant to eat or drink here because the place has a strong cat odour, but we were both too excited to be around the cats to care.

And without further ado: cat pics!

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My favourite is Brie, a beautiful calico with a smooth, silky coat. She’s one of the cats with an asterisks on the kitty menu; which means she can be moody. But she was an angel during our visit ! We were able to pet her multiple times; she had this haughty look that said “I shall tolerate your presence… for now.” Adorable!

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Chonky Brie.

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Miki was asleep the entire time. We were able to pet her without her waking up. I think she quite enjoyed it!

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The Hubs and Patches, a tuxedo cat. Patches was also in the mood for head scritches, a good five to ten minute session.

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We were lucky as many of the cats were in an agreeable mood during our visit, so we were able to touch and play with them. On my previous visit, they were not at all friendly, so it really depends on your luck as to how they’re feeling.

An important thing to remember is that CATS ARE NOT TOYS, and DO NOT come at your whim and fancy. If a cat doesn’t feel like getting close to you, you CANNOT force it to. I’ve seen many negative reviews of the cafe left by rude, entitled pricks who think that just because they pay, then the cats MUST interact with them. Some even go as far as saying that the cats are not declawed, because they got scratched.

Hello. You do not declaw a cat. It’s akin to cutting off the tips of a human’s fingers off, because cats use their claws to climb things, and it’s their way of defending themselves. I would like to see you cut your fingers off because someone finds it more convenient. Also, I’d like to see you being manhandled all hours of the day by boisterous customers and not be a little cranky.

All of the unreasonable, entitled reviews makes me cranky. Grr.

But ending this on a positive note: if you like cats, then check out Purradise! You’ll also be supporting an establishment that rescues strays.

PURRADISE CAT CAFE

First Floor, 24A, Jalan Tun Mohd Fuad 2, Taman Tun Dr Ismail, 60000 Kuala Lumpur

Opening hours: Mon – Fri (2PM – 9PM), Sat (2PM – 10PM), Sun (11AM – 7PM)

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Curry Udon @ Menya Ichiyutei, Lot 10 Kuala Lumpur

When it comes to Japanese cuisine, ramen is a staunch favourite among Klang Valley-ites – think famous chains like Ippudo and Ramen Seirock-Ya, or Japanese-owned-and-run places like the ever popular Menya Shishido.

Udon, however, gets a lot less love. Almost all of my favourite spots for udon (Miyatake Sanuki, Marufuku, Hanamaru) have closed, and these days, I struggle to find a spot that can satisfy my cravings.

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J’s Gate Dining at Lot 10 Shopping Centre, Kuala Lumpur, has an entire floor dedicated to Japanese restaurants and eateries – so it seemed a good place as any to look for udon. True enough, we found Menya Ichiyutei, which specialises in curry udon. Their signatures are the Creamy Curry Udon and the Pumpkin Curry Udon – but they looked a little too heavy for our early lunch, so we ended up ordering other items instead. Aside from curry udon, they also carry a selection of dashi udon and rice bowls.

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My Beef and Egg Curry Udon (RM21.70 – regular, RM24.60 – large) featured a generous portion of noodles, a runny egg, and tender, thinly sliced beef. It was decent, but not spectacular. The curry was well balanced, with a hint of spice cutting through the sweetness. I wished the noodles were cooked al dente, though, as they were soft and did not have much bite. One thing I liked is that the shop provides free flow of tenkasu (deep fried tempura flour batter) so you can pair it with your noodles for some crunch.

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Hubs ordered the Fish Cake Tempura Curry Udon (regular – RM15.80, large – RM18.70).

Overall, what we tried at Menya Ichiyutei was enjoyable, but lacks that oomph factor. Still, service is fast and efficient, and the setting is comfortable – so it can be a choice for those craving curry udon while in the area.

In the meantime, my quest for the best udon joint continues…

MENYA ICHIYUTEI

P1-03, J’s Gate Dining, Level 4, Lot 10 Shopping Centre, 50250, Kuala Lumpur

Opening hours: 11AM – 8PM (daily)

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Rolling Daruma x Olfactory Bulb, Kota Damansara

If you like creative Japanese cuisine, alcoholic desserts, and inventive cocktails, Rolling Daruma x Olfactory Bulb hits all the right spots, served in a cozy setting ideal for intimate get-togethers. The Hubs and I stumbled on this place purely by chance: we were hunting for dinner around Kota Damansara and saw their menu on the sidewalk; our interest piqued by offerings of Japanese tapas, donburis, and ramen.

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Two red darumas greet visitors at the entrance, where the bar is. The space is mostly black and grey, with warm lights and concrete accents, giving it an industrial look. I especially like the decorative cracks on the wall, which are varnished to create a glossy look.

The menu is pretty extensive, but since we were not very hungry, the Hubs and I decided to share a main, a Japas (japanese tapas), and a drink.

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Our choice of Japas was Bourbon-Peach Pulled Pork on Deep-Fried Mantou Bun (RM16), featuring pork shoulder loin, slow cooked til tender for eight hours in balsamic vinegar and peach and bourbon sauce. The taste of the bourbon is mild, but it lends a rich depth to the soft, melt-in-the-mouth pulled pork. The fried mantou is crisp on the edges and soft on the inside, so you have a nice medley of flavours and textures.

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We also got their signature Gyoza Ramen in Sake Pork Bone Broth (RM24). I was expecting the gyoza to be served on the side and was surprised to find them swimming in the soup, which also came with egg, a smattering of seaweed, corn, and spring onions. Some ramen dishes come with rich soup; this was mild but still flavourful, so you don’t feel overwhelmed. The noodles were too soft for my liking, but otherwise this was a decent bowl of ramen.

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No libations for me, but the resto serves plenty of non-alcoholic drinks too such as mocktails and shakes. We got a Salty Yuzie-San (RM16), a refreshing mix of lemon, kaffir lime leaves and yuzu sauce balanced with pandan syrup, brown sugar, and soda water. Perfect for quenching your thirst on a hot day, or just to cut through any greasiness from the food.

Service was friendly with most of the servers, but the one assigned to our table was probably having a bad day because he looked tired and sounded disinterested when taking our orders, and seemed to heave a visible sigh when we requested for an extra bowl. I hope you have a better day, man!

There are still many things we have yet to try at Rolling Daruma x Olfactory Bulb; and I’d like to make a return visit when I’m in the neighbourhood again to try their other items – reviews seem to be stellar for their desserts and coffee.

ROLLING DARUMA X OLFACTORY BULB

15-2, Jalan PJU 5/13 Dataran Sunway, Kota Damansara, Petaling Jaya 47810, Selangor

Phone: 03-61511108

Open: Wed-Fri (5.30PM – 11.30PM), Sat-Sun (11.30AM – 11.30PM). Closed Mondays and Tuesdays

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Food at IKEA Malaysia – What Do You Usually Get?

We went to IKEA Damansara last month to buy a new desk— and hopefully have The Hubs try their famous meatballs — but the food court was so packed we just got the furniture and had lunch somewhere else. Which was a shame, as I was looking forward to enjoying the food again (the last time I had their meatballs was in 2016!)

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Last weekend, we thought of trying our luck again over lunch. It’s the Ramadhan month and our Muslim friends are fasting, so we presumed that the crowd would be less.

WRONG.

Despite being early (we got there around 11.30am), the queue at the food court was exactly the same as it would have been prior to Ramadhan; only filled with people of other races. I guess the appeal of IKEA food transcends all. To be fair, the line moved pretty fast, so we only had to wait for about 20 minutes to get to the ordering counter.

If you haven’t been to IKEA Damansara, here’s how the system works: you grab a trolley for your trays and wheel it down the line, where there are ‘self service’ stations. If you’d like a free-flow drink, you can grab one of the cups or glasses (you can choose between coffee/tea or cold juices/carbonated beverages). Further along are shelves with lighter meals such as salads and cakes. You then come to the ‘mains’ counter, where you place an order with the staff (all of the food is ready so they’ll just load it up for you). Before coming to the cashier, there are more light snacks to choose from: bread rolls, pastries, hot dogs, fried items, mushroom soup, etc. Finally, past the cashiers are the cutlery and drink stations.

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The food court has a huge capacity and operates semi-self service style: you’re expected to return your trays and trolleys to a designated area once you’re done—which keeps the place clean and reduces the need for a lot of staff.

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As usual, when you’re hungry, you tend to order more than you need—which was what happened to us lol. In retrospect, I think one plate of meatballs would have been enough between us, and we could have gotten a wider variety of lighter items to try.

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The meatballs (RM16.50) came in a generous portion; each plate had 17 pieces, a dollop of lingonberry jam, creamy mashed potatoes, and buttered vegetables, all drenched in a brown sauce. The sauce didn’t have that much of a taste, but what elevated the meatballs was the sour/sweet lingonberry sauce, which went surprisingly well with the meat. I also enjoyed the mashed potatoes, which was creamy and flavourful.

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Another winner for me was the mushroom soup. It was creamy but not cloying, had generous amounts of mushrooms in it (none of that watery shit you get from some restos), and was overall just warm and comforting, especially when enjoyed with the bread roll.

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As for extras, I grabbed a bit of everything to try—so there was fried popiah, chicken sausage, fried wontons, and a chocolate roll. Hubs didn’t like the popiah and the chicken sausage, as he said the former was too sweet, and the latter had a plasticky feel, but I felt both were decent enough lol. The chicken wontons were bit hard on the outside, but there was a lot of filling.

While many people come here for the meatballs, their other items like the fried/grilled chicken wings, salmon, and plant-based dishes such as the rendang burger, are also popular. And if you haven’t had your fill of the food here, you can also buy frozen versions to enjoy at home!

What do you usually order at IKEA?

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Super Kitchen Chilli Pan Mee, Damen Mall USJ

You’ve probably heard of pan mee (or ban mian, literally ‘board noodles’), the popular Chinese noodle dish served in soup, with various condiments such as minced pork and anchovies. But did you know that chilli pan mee is a wholly Malaysian invention?

Chilli pan mee traces its roots to Chow Kit, Kuala Lumpur in 1985—the brainchild of one Tan Kok Hong, proprietor of the now legendary Kin Kin Pan Mee restaurant. Tan initially sold regular soup pan mee, but noticed his patrons adding chillies to their dishes. After a lot of experimentation, the chilli pan mee that we know today was born. I think it’s an excellent example of how the Malaysian-Chinese diaspora have taken elements of local culture and blended it into their cuisine, birthing something unique altogether.

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It has been ages since I last had a solid bowl of chilli pan mee. The cravings led the Hubs and I to DaMen Mall in USJ, where Super Kitchen Chilli Pan Mee has a small branch within the mall’s non-halal food court. I have tried the chain’s SS2 outlet and it is consistently good, so I was expecting the same from this outlet. Thankfully, it did not disappoint!

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The Hubs and I both ordered the signature chilli pan mee, which came in a generous serving topped with fried anchovies, minced pork, fried shallots, lard, and a runny egg. The chilli flakes are served separately, so you can adjust your level of spiciness. The noodles were cooked al dente, and the runny egg yolk created that smooth, silky texture which bound all of the elements well together.

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The Hubs loved their fried dumplings, which were fried fresh to order. The meat was moist and juicy, while the outside was crisp and fried to perfection.

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Cold longan drinks to quench our thirst!

Damen is kind of a dead mall on weekdays, so when we got to the food court, it literally looked semi-abandoned lol. The stall was the only one open, there was no one else sitting in the section, and some of the lights were not even turned on. But I was satisfied with the food quality and freshness (something that restos with low traffic may struggle with)—and me being anti-social, a quiet environment to dine in was just perfect!

Prices are reasonable for the setting. I would even say they’re one of the more affordable options when you’re at DaMen.

SUPER KITCHEN CHILLI PAN MEE (DAMEN USJ)
L3, Damen Mall, No. 1, Persiaran Kewajipan, USJ 1, 47600 Subang Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia.

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